Just Like RED China: The Deep State Right in Your Own Home

 

“Alexa, it’s Sunday and I feel like going to mass. Please find me a church”You are now on a list…”What list?”…It’s not a good idea to protest…”But then I am inviting over some parishioners to watch football”…The smart meter is ready to determine how many will actually be present…The video cameras outside will get their license plates…

 

 

How Amazon will take over your house

By Erica Pandey

August 1, 2019

In recent years, Amazon has made a series of investments, acquisitions and R&D moves in the smart home industry. None seemed particularly consequential on its own, but with a real estate deal last week, Amazon appears to have captured first-mover advantage in one of the most important new industries on the planet.

Why it matters: With the deals, Amazon has taken a pioneering lead in what has come to be called “surveillance capitalism,” which includes some of the biggest businesses of the future, like 5G, autonomous vehicles and smart cities. Now, the behemoth, with its edge in this new economy, is positioned to explode its revenue.

“Amazon has entered the surveillance capitalism domain with a very big bang,” says Shoshana Zuboff, author of “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism.” “Once you have this as your lens, and you look at Amazon, you will never look back.”

  • The company has “already got all of this behavioral data flowing every which way,” she says. “Now they’re thinking, ‘We can be a Google or a Facebook on top of what we’ve already got. Not only do we know what they know, but we know stuff that they don’t know. We don’t have to infer that you’re interested in a white T-shirt with a big rose on the chest. We actually know because you bought one.'”
  • Other tech giants aren’t “even in the same universe as Amazon,” says Amy Webb, founder of the Future Today Institute. “We’re talking about an entirely new ecosystem that is literally being born in front of our eyes.”

What’s happening: Amazon’s newest offering, a deal announced last week with Realogy, connects homebuyers to real estate agents and gives them $5,000 in smart devices and services when they close the deal. The huge upside for Amazon is unchecked access to the data-rich interiors of our homes.

  • On paper, Amazon is giving out cool stuff for free. But the company is also getting “extremely inexpensive access to record some of the most intimate parts of your life,” says Meredith Whittaker, co-founder of the AI Now Institute.
  • “There are hundreds of millions of marketing dollars that go into presenting these as sleek, convenience devices, but smart home is a misnomer. We’re really talking about a surveillance home” that feeds tech firms data that is far more personal and valuable than what is garnered from an Instagram like or an online purchase.

Speaking to Axios, Amazon says that its speakers and cameras can be turned off at will and come with lights that signal when they are recording. It also says customers can log onto portals and delete whatever they want.

  • Amazon is actually “ahead of the curve on transparency” compared to its rivals, says Adam Wright, an Internet of Things analyst at the International Data Corporation.
  • Still, there’s a chasm between what the company says it does and what is technically possible, Whittaker says.

And there’s more.

  • Amazon has rolled out Echo, its smart speaker, Ring, its camera doorbell, and dozens of other Alexa-enabled smart appliances. And Amazon is winning: about 70% of people who own smart speakers have Amazon’s devices, according to a recent report from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.
  • It partnered with Lennar, the country’s largest homebuilder to put up houses that have internet “built into the walls and floors,” making them the perfect shells for smart devices from Alexa to Ring, reports CNBC. And these homes aren’t just for the rich. There are affordable versions being propped up in blue-collar neighborhoods. too, Webb says.
  • Amazon has also invested in Plant Prefab, a startup which constructs smart houses.

The result, per Webb, is “Amazon in literally every nook and cranny of our home because either it built us the home, or it has got devices in the home, or it helped sell us the home.”

  • This plays into Amazon’s hands because consumers are increasingly likely to buy into one stack of devices instead of a patchwork, says Wright. “There’s less friction, and the further you get into the Amazon ecosystem, the less likely you are to switch over to Google or Samsung or another competitor.”

Once Amazon has planted its flag in a house, there’s a lot it could do, experts say.

  • For example, emails obtained by Vice revealed that Amazon has teamed up with over 200 U.S. police departments in a partnership that — with owners’ consent — lets officers see which homes have Amazon’s video doorbell, Ring, and request footage from the owners of those devices. “Police do not need a warrant to ask for footage,” writes Vice’s Caroline Haskins.
  • Look for the company’s advertising business to keep pushing up against that of Google or Facebook as it gets smarter about predicting human behavior, says Zuboff. Amazon could also use the data it collects from conversations and movements inside customers’ houses to entice them to spend more money on its site by getting better at figuring out what they want to buy
  • On top of that, the company is wading into selling health insurance. Surveillance could theoretically reveal if a prospective insurance buyer has a pre-existing condition or mental health issues.

What to watch: Amazon is ahead, but “this isn’t a one-horse race yet,” Wright says. Google, for instance, is working with construction firms to pre-install its WiFi in new homes and set the stage for its devices.

Go deeper: A closer look at the surveillance economy

 

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Amazon subsidized by the American Taxpayer!

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Xi Jinping Ramps Up Religious Persecution

“There’s only one allowed religion in China, and that’s secular socialism,” Steven Mosher, president of the Population Research Institute, tells National Review. “And the Church is the community party, the acolytes, its members, and their pontiff, Chinese president Xi Jinping himself.”

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GO RED CHINA! GO RED CHINA!

And for Fascism, which rides in from the left, a great way to maintain control is to control the communications and total control via surveillance. Now to the checklist.

 

Coming to Taiwan, America, the World: The Happy RED Chinese Surveillance State

Editor’s Note: RED China’s One World One Dream blueprint. First Tibet, then Xinjiang and elsewhere in RED China, then Taiwan, then America, and the rest of the world. S.U.A. has constantly warned about the goals of  The Deep State in which RED China has been selected as the Mother of Managers for the world. And as what occurred with Hitler and the Nazis, some world governments remain silent or outright lie about it being a “Happy Place”.

The Deep State: “Using the Global War on Terror as a Pretext for Control”

“THOSE WHO RESIST WILL PERISH!”

Chilling undercover footage taken inside China’s most oppressive region shows it’s virtually impossible to escape the paranoid police state.

By Alexandra Ma, Business Insider

 

  • Two journalists pretended to be travel bloggers to enter Xinjiang, the western Chinese province where police are intensely cracking down on the Uighurs, a mostly-Muslim ethnic minority.
  • They found themselves constantly tailed by both uniformed and plainclothes police officers, who made them delete photos on their devices and ordered locals to stop talking to them.
  • China’s ruling Communist Party regularly cracks down on online content and people deemed unsavory or destabilizing to the regime. This paranoia is particularly evident in Xinjiang.

A chilling new documentary created by two undercover reporters reveals the paranoia at the heart of China’s 21st-century police state in Xinjiang, the western frontier region where authorities are cracking down on millions of Muslims.

The VICE News Tonight documentary shows dozens of police officers lining the streets of Xinjiang and repeatedly questioning the journalists, who had posed as travel bloggers in order to enter the region.

The documentary — titled “They Come For us at Night: China’s Vanishing Muslims” — premiered Thursday night. It focuses on the plight of the Uighurs, a mostly-Muslim ethnic minority under intense surveillance and oppression by Beijing authorities in Xinjiang.

China justifies its crackdown by describing Uighurs as national-security threats, but experts say it could also be because Beijing wants to protect its infrastructure along the Belt and Road, a massive trade project connecting China with the rest of the world.

Uighurs in the region constantly live in fear of being detained and taken to one of China’s prison-like camps, which authorities euphemistically call “free vocational training centers.”

Former detainees in such camps have described being physically and mentally tortured.

Uighurs are not allowed to communicate with people outside the region. Uighurs living abroad previously told Business Insider of their anguish at being blocked by their families in Xinjiang to avoid getting arrested.

The documentary shows the journalists repeatedly being stopped on the street and forced to delete all the footage on their phones, even as they insisted that they were tourists snapping photos for their own leisure.

Despite the heightened security apparatus in Xinjiang, the region has continued to attract tourists, but authorities say they can only take photos of sidewalks and tourist sites.

At one point in the documentary, two police officers who appear to be in anti-riot gear are seen stopping the reporters from talking to two local men in Kashgar, a major city in the region. Those two men, ironically, had been praising local law enforcement.

“Individuals cannot accept interviews without government approval,” one police officer can be heard saying. “Especially in Xinjiang.”

Isobel Yeung, one of the VICE News reporters, told Business Insider: “I can’t even count how many times we were stopped. It didn’t help that I was constantly mistaken for a Uighur.”

“Their goal was to keep close tabs on us, to track our every move, and to try to ensure we didn’t take photos or video of anything the Communist Party of China considers sensitive,” Yeung added. “They didn’t know we were filming secretly.”

China’s distrust of the Uighurs permeates into daily life. Authorities require residents to place QR codes on knives— even for those used in the kitchen — so they can track whether they are being used as weapon.

While visiting a wheat dumpling stall, the VICE News reporters also noticed that an axe for chopping firewood had been chained to the ground in accordance with regional rules.

‘It does strange things to the mind’

China’s ruling Communist Party regularly cracks down on content and people deemed unsavory to the regime. It believes that by censoring content and, in some cases, detaining dissidents, it is maintaining political and social stability.

This paranoia is particularly evident in Xinjiang, with journalists having described being tailed by plainclothes officers — as many as six in the VICE News’s case. The country has hired more than 100,000 new police officers over the past two years alone.

Reporters from The New York Times and Agence France-Presse have previously reported seeing police stage fake car crashes to disrupt their travels.

Yeung, the VICE News correspondent, told Business Insider that being tailed by police “makes you paranoid to go places or say things.”

“It does strange things to the mind, to know that there are people watching and listening to your every move,” she said. “It makes you paranoid to go places or say things, even among my colleague and I and while in the comfort of our hotel rooms.”

“I can only imagine what living there would do to you.”

Watch the full documentary here:

 

 

“The Transformation Through Education Kit”

 

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Good Morning Taiwan! Reeducating Taiwan’s Chinese.

 


A COMMON CORE CLASS FROM THOSE THAT KNOW BETTER.

‘Reeducating’ Xinjiang’s Muslims

By James Millward. NYBooks
February 7, 2019
She told the court how she had been transferred the previous November from her school to a new job teachingIn a courtroom in Zharkent, Kazakhstan, in July 2018, a former kindergarten principal named Sayragul Sauytbay calmly described what Chinese officials continue to deny: a vast new gulag of “de-extremification training centers” has been created for Turkic Muslim inhabitants of Xinjiang, the Alaska-sized region in western China. Sauytbay, an ethnic Kazakh, had fled Xinjiang and was seeking asylum in Kazakhstan, where her husband and son are citizens.  She told the court how she had been transferred the previous November from her school to a new job teaching Kazakh detainees in a supposed “training center.” “They call it a ‘political camp’…but in reality it’s a prison in the mountains,” she said. There were 2,500 inmates in the facility where she had worked for four months, and she knew of others. There may now be as many as 1,200 such camps in Xinjiang, imprisoning up to a million people, including Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, and especially Uighurs, who make up around 46 percent of Xinjiang’s population.Sauytbay’s testimony provided the first dramatic public evidence from a Chinese citizen of the expanding gulag in Xinjiang. But news of it has been emerging since 2017, thanks to remarkable reporting by Gerry Shih (now at The Washington Post) for the Associated Press and Josh Chin, Clément Bürge, and Giulia Marchi for The Wall Street Journal, as well as important early stories from other researchers and correspondents, including Maya Wang (Human Rights Watch), Rob Schmitz (NPR), and Megha Rajagopalan (BuzzFeed News). Especially important is the Washington, D.C.–based Radio Free Asia Uighur service, which has for years provided detailed, accurate coverage despite notorious controls on information in Xinjiang.At first, officials in the People’s Republic of China (PRC) denied there were any camps. Then state media briefly floated a story that 460,000 Uighurs from southern Xinjiang had been “relocated” to “jobs” elsewhere in the Xinjiang region. There have been no further announcements about that jobs program, and the explanation seems to have been dropped. When confronted at an August 2018 UN hearing by Gay McDougal, a member of the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, the Chinese delegation denied that there were any “reeducation” camps, while admitting that there were “vocational education and employment training centers” and other “measures” to counter “extremism.” When pressed again at the UN Human Rights Council’s universal periodic review in November 2018, the PRC representative accused “a few countries” of “politically driven accusations” and repeated that the camps were simply providing vocational training to combat extremism.People outside Xinjiang first began to learn about the camps in 2017. Uighurs abroad grew alarmed as friends and relatives at home dropped out of touch, first deleting phone and social media contacts and then…ArticleThe World View:The future of Google Maps and Mapquest for getting directions to all the franchised “Happy Camps”

 

“GO RED CHINA! GO RED CHINA!”

 


New NSA data centers in Utah for all that data from Obamacare and … :