Red October Operations Target the Deep State

 

SPECIAL RELEASE: Interview with MG Paul Vallely:

OPERATION RED OCTOBER: TAKING DOWN THE DEEP STATE.

Editor’s Note: From our friend and true patriot, Mike Filip.

SUA has proprietary information as many events happened long before HAMMER was exposed. 

Audio Interview with MG Paul Vallely

 

“How come the lights went on before he clapped?”

 

Interview with MG Paul Vallely, USA (ret.) on The Rule of Law

 

 

The Rule of Law:

The preservation of The Republic is critical for the future of America. The Constitution of the United States and the Well Being of American Citizens all depend on the Judicial outcome of the evil and seditious attempt to take down a Duly Elected President. We are waiting to witness and hear the results of Attorney General Barr’s findings. Will the rule of law apply to those senior government officials involved in the Silent Coup?

Interview Link

 

OBAMA ADMIN AND DAZIS SPECIFICALLY TARGETTED FLYNN ALL ALONG


Editor’s Note: For the knucklehead puppets in the mass media as well as the nitwits that belong to the DAZI cult of lunacy, sabotage, and destruction, Lt. General Michael Flynn is the consummate intelligence professional. 

Flynn attorney requests ‘Brady’ material to prove feds withheld evidence

By: Rowen Scarborough

September 15, 2019

The Washington Times

Retired Army Gen. Michael Flynn is picking up where Republicans left off last year as he tries to turn the FBI inside out to find new evidence.

The House GOP in 2017-18 launched an aggressive investigation into decisions by the Barack Obama administration to put the FBI’s Russia probe squarely on President Trump and his colleagues.

Among other discoveries, Republicans found out that the FBI relied on a now-discredited Democratic Party-financed dossier to obtain wiretaps and run down its anti-Trump allegations.

The midterm elections ousted GOP House control, stopping the inquisitors.

Now Flynn’s new attorney Sidney Powell has filed court motions to try to unearth documents on how the FBI pursued not just the former general but the Trump cast.

Ms. Powell, a Texas appeals attorney, wants to prove that former special counsel Robert Mueller didn’t abide by U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan’s “Brady” order in February 2018. (The term derives from the 1963 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Brady v. Maryland that mandates that prosecutors turn over exculpatory evidence to the defense.)

Michael Caputo, a Trump campaign adviser, says Ms. Powell has documented Justice Department chicanery in the past.

“When the bogus Russia investigations started, many of us caught up in the hoax passed around Sidney Powell’s book ‘Licensed to Lie’ to prepare for the worst,” Mr. Caputo told The Washington Times. “She’s a real expert on the Justice Department’s habit of hiding exculpatory information. Today she’s representing all of America, shining a light on this systemic corruption and advancing our knowledge of the origins of this politically commissioned inquiry.”

Ms. Powell filed an extraordinary motion last week, listing a smorgasbord of documents she wants Judge Sullivan to force the government to relinquish.

Her aim is twofold: First, find Brady material by delving deep inside the FBI and the Justice Department’s TrumpRussia probe, akin to how Republicans did the same chore last year. Second, ask the judge to dismiss the case based on a Brady violation.

Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Brandon Van Grack quickly rejected the bid, saying the prosecution ended with Flynn’s guilty plea.

“The government has exceeded its discovery and disclosure obligations in this matter, including those imposed pursuant to Brady v. Maryland,” Mr. Grack said in an Aug. 30 filing.

Said Ms. Powell: “Not only have the prosecutors thumbed their noses at this court’s order, they have ignored the rules of ethical conduct for the D.C. Bar.”

In a list of 40-plus items, she is demanding access to FBI agent interview notes, or 302s; internal memos; wiretap transcripts; and records of any anti-Flynn leaks to reporters.

Some are tantalizing. Ms. Powell asserts that the British Embassy may have sent a letter to the new Trump White House warning that Christopher Steele, the dossier writer, was unreliable.

Flynn, briefly Mr. Trump’s national security adviser, pleaded guilty to lying to two FBI agents. They visited the White House on Jan. 24, 2017, to ask him about phone calls he conducted with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. The agents, including Peter Strzok, knew what Flynn had said. Flynn committed a falsehood by saying he had not urged Kremlin restraint over Obama economic sanctions when he did in fact say that.

Flynn’s sentencing was delayed while he cooperated with prosecutors in a case tied to foreign lobbying, not Russian election interference.

Mr. Mueller concluded his 22-month probe in March with a verdict that he could not establish that the Trump campaign conspired with Moscow in 2016 election trespassing.

Since Flynn’s guilty plea on Dec. 1, 2017 — 20 months ago — new revelations emerged about how the FBI went about targeting Trump aides, including Flynn. He fired his defense team and summoned Ms. Powell, long a Brady champion.

Among new disclosures since the guilty plea:

⦁ The Republican majority on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence reported in May 2018 on closed-door testimony from then-Deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe. Mr. McCabe testified that the agents who interviewed Flynn “didn’t think he was lying.”

⦁ Former FBI Director James B. Comey said at a public event that he sent agents to interview Flynn when he knew the White House was in its early chaotic days and he didn’t have to first go through the president’s counsel. Flynn had no legal counsel to prepare him for the agents — one of whom, Mr. Strzok, held great hostility toward the new president.

Ms. Powell’s long list of Brady demands:

⦁ Stefan Halper’s role in providing the FBI with any information on Flynn. Mr. Halper is a Washington national security adviser and Cambridge University professor who was retained by the FBI to spy on Trump campaign advisers. Flynn wants “all payments, notes, memos, correspondence, and instructions by and between the FBI, CIA or DoD with Stefan Halper.”

⦁ All un-redacted text messages between Mr. Strzok and his then-girlfriend, former FBI counsel Lisa Page. They both expressed deep dislike of candidate Trump and his supporters.

⦁ Any wiretap applications that deal with Flynn. (It is known the FBI obtained four wiretap warrants on Trump volunteer Carter Page based largely on the dossier.)

⦁ Information on any U.S. intelligence spies assigned to Flynn since he retired in 2014 after heading the Defense Intelligence Agency.

⦁ All information that came from State Department official Kathleen Kavalec, one of several Obama political appointees who met with Mr. Steele or received his anti-Trump allegations.

⦁ Records of Bruce Ohr, another Obama official who met with Mr. Steele and his employer — Fusion GPS, Hillary Clinton’s opposition research firm. Mr. Ohr conveyed Mr. Steele’s allegations to the FBI and Justice Department lawyers. Mr. Ohr was associate deputy attorney general at the time.

⦁ The phone records of former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and Washington Post columnist David Ignatius. Mr. Ignatius broke the story on U.S. intercepts of Flynn’s phone calls with Mr. Kislyak.

Conservative pundits say someone in the Obama administration committed a felony with that leak.

⦁ Any FBI records on leaks to the press on Flynn from top Obama officials.

Judge Sullivan said in a written order Sept. 11: “There is a strong presumption in favor of public access to judicial records.”

During his cooperation phase, Flynn sat down with the FBI for “multiple debriefings in 2017-18,” the final Mueller report said.

Regarding Flynn, the report focused on his time in the presidential transition as he conducted phone calls with Mr. Kislyak. There is no evidence of any Russia election collusion.

When Flynn pleaded guilty in 2017, the media, including the New York Times, wrote stories implying that his Mueller cooperation meant big trouble for Mr. Trump in the Russia probe. Flynn provided no such evidence.

The New York Times wrote: “Mr. Flynn’s decision to plead guilty to lying to investigators about those conversations marked a significant new phase in the investigation of the special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, and a politically treacherous development for the president and his closest aides, whose activities in the West Wing are being scrutinized by F.B.I. agents, lawmakers, federal prosecutors and the media.”

Article

Very Important Supporting Document:
Flynn’s motion citing Clinton-FBI alliance

VIP LEGAL DOCUMENT

 

“How come the lights went on before he clapped?”

Just Like RED China: The Deep State Right in Your Own Home

 

“Alexa, it’s Sunday and I feel like going to mass. Please find me a church”You are now on a list…”What list?”…It’s not a good idea to protest…”But then I am inviting over some parishioners to watch football”…The smart meter is ready to determine how many will actually be present…The video cameras outside will get their license plates…

 

 

How Amazon will take over your house

By Erica Pandey

August 1, 2019

In recent years, Amazon has made a series of investments, acquisitions and R&D moves in the smart home industry. None seemed particularly consequential on its own, but with a real estate deal last week, Amazon appears to have captured first-mover advantage in one of the most important new industries on the planet.

Why it matters: With the deals, Amazon has taken a pioneering lead in what has come to be called “surveillance capitalism,” which includes some of the biggest businesses of the future, like 5G, autonomous vehicles and smart cities. Now, the behemoth, with its edge in this new economy, is positioned to explode its revenue.

“Amazon has entered the surveillance capitalism domain with a very big bang,” says Shoshana Zuboff, author of “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism.” “Once you have this as your lens, and you look at Amazon, you will never look back.”

  • The company has “already got all of this behavioral data flowing every which way,” she says. “Now they’re thinking, ‘We can be a Google or a Facebook on top of what we’ve already got. Not only do we know what they know, but we know stuff that they don’t know. We don’t have to infer that you’re interested in a white T-shirt with a big rose on the chest. We actually know because you bought one.'”
  • Other tech giants aren’t “even in the same universe as Amazon,” says Amy Webb, founder of the Future Today Institute. “We’re talking about an entirely new ecosystem that is literally being born in front of our eyes.”

What’s happening: Amazon’s newest offering, a deal announced last week with Realogy, connects homebuyers to real estate agents and gives them $5,000 in smart devices and services when they close the deal. The huge upside for Amazon is unchecked access to the data-rich interiors of our homes.

  • On paper, Amazon is giving out cool stuff for free. But the company is also getting “extremely inexpensive access to record some of the most intimate parts of your life,” says Meredith Whittaker, co-founder of the AI Now Institute.
  • “There are hundreds of millions of marketing dollars that go into presenting these as sleek, convenience devices, but smart home is a misnomer. We’re really talking about a surveillance home” that feeds tech firms data that is far more personal and valuable than what is garnered from an Instagram like or an online purchase.

Speaking to Axios, Amazon says that its speakers and cameras can be turned off at will and come with lights that signal when they are recording. It also says customers can log onto portals and delete whatever they want.

  • Amazon is actually “ahead of the curve on transparency” compared to its rivals, says Adam Wright, an Internet of Things analyst at the International Data Corporation.
  • Still, there’s a chasm between what the company says it does and what is technically possible, Whittaker says.

And there’s more.

  • Amazon has rolled out Echo, its smart speaker, Ring, its camera doorbell, and dozens of other Alexa-enabled smart appliances. And Amazon is winning: about 70% of people who own smart speakers have Amazon’s devices, according to a recent report from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners.
  • It partnered with Lennar, the country’s largest homebuilder to put up houses that have internet “built into the walls and floors,” making them the perfect shells for smart devices from Alexa to Ring, reports CNBC. And these homes aren’t just for the rich. There are affordable versions being propped up in blue-collar neighborhoods. too, Webb says.
  • Amazon has also invested in Plant Prefab, a startup which constructs smart houses.

The result, per Webb, is “Amazon in literally every nook and cranny of our home because either it built us the home, or it has got devices in the home, or it helped sell us the home.”

  • This plays into Amazon’s hands because consumers are increasingly likely to buy into one stack of devices instead of a patchwork, says Wright. “There’s less friction, and the further you get into the Amazon ecosystem, the less likely you are to switch over to Google or Samsung or another competitor.”

Once Amazon has planted its flag in a house, there’s a lot it could do, experts say.

  • For example, emails obtained by Vice revealed that Amazon has teamed up with over 200 U.S. police departments in a partnership that — with owners’ consent — lets officers see which homes have Amazon’s video doorbell, Ring, and request footage from the owners of those devices. “Police do not need a warrant to ask for footage,” writes Vice’s Caroline Haskins.
  • Look for the company’s advertising business to keep pushing up against that of Google or Facebook as it gets smarter about predicting human behavior, says Zuboff. Amazon could also use the data it collects from conversations and movements inside customers’ houses to entice them to spend more money on its site by getting better at figuring out what they want to buy
  • On top of that, the company is wading into selling health insurance. Surveillance could theoretically reveal if a prospective insurance buyer has a pre-existing condition or mental health issues.

What to watch: Amazon is ahead, but “this isn’t a one-horse race yet,” Wright says. Google, for instance, is working with construction firms to pre-install its WiFi in new homes and set the stage for its devices.

Go deeper: A closer look at the surveillance economy

 

Article

Very Important!

Supporting Information

Amazon subsidized by the American Taxpayer!

Important Information

Important Information

Important Information

Xi Jinping Ramps Up Religious Persecution

“There’s only one allowed religion in China, and that’s secular socialism,” Steven Mosher, president of the Population Research Institute, tells National Review. “And the Church is the community party, the acolytes, its members, and their pontiff, Chinese president Xi Jinping himself.”

Important Information

 

GO RED CHINA! GO RED CHINA!

And for Fascism, which rides in from the left, a great way to maintain control is to control the communications and total control via surveillance. Now to the checklist.

 

The Deep State’s Total Control with Beijing as the Mother of Managers

 

A Status Review

The good news is that our Mother of Managers, RED China, continues to franchise its “One World, One Dream” surveillance and control solution based on its own Golden Shield initiative which produces “Happy Populations and Consumers” that our actuarily our LRUs for predictable profit margin percentages.

Even though Hillary missed her moment again, Diane and her driver, Nancy, the FBI, DOJ, State, NSA, and “Central” have been very helpful.

On the downside, NAFTA and the TPP were exposed, however, the drug trade, human trafficking, and organ harvesting ventures are thriving. Others should implement the “Planned Parenthood” disguise.

Also, the Village Idiots have still not figured out the pretext and goal of Arab Spring, and we really cut it close with The Thing from 1890’s, SSN # 042-68-4425, fake war on Libya and used the crisis to expand our pretext of the Global War on Terror into Europe to ultimately benefit RED China’s loan sharking and total control blueprint.

Syria was never on the Arab Spring list, but we also turned it into an opportunity for “Sustainable Development Wherever the UN Goes or Doesn’t Go When It Ideally Should” with less people as we did with Bosnia, Rwanda, Somalia etc.

Trump like Reagan has interrupted the implementation of the blueprint, but we have some plans and eventually one will work to get the implementation back on track as we are so very close. The good news is Americans are getting dumber by the minute as well as being crushed with debt while thinking their “schooling” is giving them the skill sets for financial success while we have put all the roadblocks in place to prevent that from happening thanks to all our puppets in the U.S. Congress. Eventually they will succumb to the bait of free stuff and be totally dependent on us.

Eventually, with the success of RED China’s “One World, One Dream” solution, we will be able to overcome any resistance to our plan via its built in hostage taking and extortion. RED China’s partnership with NSA and “Central” has made good use of this in America. We must continue on this path and someday very soon all will wake up from The Dream and realize it is not their Dream but our Dream and they will not be able to do anything about it when it becomes their nightmare for our benefit.

Once again, election seasons are coming up again, and we must focus on placing more Emirs into our future areas of control so that we can remove all aspects of resistance. We must make Eichmann proud!

 

 

Editors Note: Farming, Mining, and Management of The Human Kind : The pretext of altruistic endeavors that just suddenly become predatory and parasitic.

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

The Blueprint for RED China’s One World One Dream:

How Arab governments use cyberspace laws to shut down activism

Critical Arab voices are being silenced on Twitter, and laws across the Middle East are created to further this cause.

by Yarno Ritzen
25 Jul 2019

In this series of articles, Al Jazeera examines how Twitter in the Middle East has changed since the Arab Spring. 

Government talking points are being magnified through thousands of accounts during politically fraught times and silencing people on Twitter is only part of a large-scale effort by governments to stop human rights activists and opponents of the state from being heard. 

For human rights activists, journalists, dissidents and free speech campaigners, social media has long been a double-edged sword, representing both the positive and harmful aspects of open communication on the internet.

On the one hand, platforms such as Twitter and Facebook allow activists the opportunity to spread their message, reaching an audience they could only dream of before the internet.

But on the other, the nature of open communication raises the risk of being followed, exposed or worse, as some governments increase their digital surveillance capabilities.

As a result, governments around the world are turning social media against their citizens.

China is the country where government control of the internet is by far the most egregious, but many countries in the Middle East are not far behind when it comes to using the internet against those who fight for a more open society, the annual Freedom of the Net report by Freedom House concluded.

Mohamad Najem, executive director at Beirut-based SMEX, a digital rights organisation focusing on issues related to freedom of expression, online privacy and safety, said social media movements had taken the Middle East by surprise and governments adapted relatively quickly, using social media against protesters and civil rights activists.

Over the last decade, SMEX has tracked how the use of social media platforms like Twitter, both by activists and governments, has changed.

“In 2011, access to these tools was still kind of new and governments underestimated them,” Najem told Al Jazeera.

Meet the activists fighting the Great Chinese Firewall

Social media allowed people in the Middle East to voice their concerns and question those in power.

During the Arab Spring, protesters were able to organise on social media, a tool that connected their realities with the rest of the world.

But governments were watching, too, and continue to closely monitor.

“Between the Arab Spring and now, we have witnessed that all the countries in the region are moving more and more towards criminalising speech,” Najem told Al Jazeera.

“The online sphere we used to go to in the Middle East to express ourselves, to talk about politics, has started to close down slowly because of all these regulations,” he added.

“People were prosecuted, thrown in jail, or they had to flee the country.”

To show what laws Middle East governments have introduced in recent years, SMEX launched Cyrilla, a website listing all proposed and passed legislation aimed at curbing free speech.

The database, which offers texts in Arabic and English and covers the entire region, shows clearly how digital liberties in the Middle East have come under attack.

Between the Arab Spring and now, we have witnessed that all the countries in the region are moving more and more towards criminalising speech.

MOHAMAD NAJEM, SMEX

It also lists several countries outside of the Middle East, including RussiaVietnam and Fiji.

“Across the Middle East, there is a large number of countries that have specifically instituted anti-terrorism and cybercrime laws that contain vague prohibitions on free speech,” Jillian York told Al Jazeera.

York is the Berlin-based director for international freedom of expression at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which aims to protect civil liberties in the digital world.

Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, UAE, Qatar; all these countries have instituted cybercrime laws and in most cases, the laws are vague – quite broad,” she said.

As an example, York cited Saudi Arabia’s counterterrorism legislation from 2014, which criminalises defamation of the state and defines calling for atheist thought as a “terrorist” action.

Recently, prominent Norway-based pro-democracy activist Iyad el-Baghdadi, a Palestinian who has been outspoken in his criticism of Saudi authority figures, made a plea for his safety after US intelligence agency CIA found a credible threat to his life from authorities in the kingdom.

El-Baghdadi is behind The Arab Tyrant Manual, which focuses on global authoritarianism and the struggle for democratic liberties in the Arab region. He is also a fellow at Civita, a leading liberal think-tank in Norway, where he sought asylum after he was forced to leave his home in the United Arab Emirates in 2015.

İyad el-Baghdadi | إياد البغدادي

@iyad_elbaghdadi

Spare a thought for all the dissidents, activists, journalists, and private citizens in the Arab world who get beaten, arrested, tortured, murdered without being passed tips and without being offered protection. They are the real heroes, and they are the real victims. Not me.

54 people are talking about this

But it is not just Saudi Arabia, as documented by organisations including Amnesty International and the Gulf Centre for Human Rights show.

Governments in the Middle East have started using platforms such as Twitter as amplifiers, using both automated bot accounts and well-known social media influencers to promote state-approved messaging, Najem said.

So, while activist voices are being drowned out by government-approved messages, sometimes amplified by fake Twitter accounts, campaigners also risk being jailed or are forced to leave the country because of newly implemented cybercrime or “antiterrorism” laws.

Last April, Saudi Arabia arrested three bloggers without giving any reasons for their arrest.

Similarly, the Turkish government cracked down hard last year on Twitter users who used the platform to voice their criticism of the Turkish military operation in northern Syria, claiming they were spreading “terrorist propaganda”.

The UAE, meanwhile, made it a criminal offence to show support for Qatar in the ongoing GCC crisis, claiming people who did so violated the federal decree on Combating Information Technology Crimes, possibly facing a jail term from three to 15 years, and a fine not less than 500,000 dirhams ($136,000).

According to both Najem and York, it is not just governments that are to blame for the crackdown on activists.

Part of the responsibility falls on social media companies for failing to address the issue of automated propaganda accounts and willingly helping governments in the region.

“One of the challenges with companies like Twitter – and most tech companies – is that they are based in Dubai. This is an issue because this is a country that has no respect for human rights, which means they have no respect for digital rights either,” Najem told Al Jazeera.

“We have a problem that all these companies that are being used for free speech, such as Twitter, are based in the Gulf. These are countries that are not signatory of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, so Article 19 of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights [giving everyone a right to freedom of opinion and expression] is not part of their mandate and freedom of expression is not something they care about.”

To add, York explained, the opaque deals these companies make with governments lead to more censorship, which is often hard to notice.

I think Twitter and all these other companies are responsible for when they say ‘yes’ whenever an authoritarian country comes to them to ask to censor certain speech.

JILLIAN YORK, EFF

“Governments sort of wisened up and, due to a number of other factors, they began instead utilising these companies to do this censorship for them,” she said.

“This is a more palatable form of censorship for the people because they don’t notice what is missing. Instead of getting an error page when you visit a website like Twitter or Facebook, the content is just missing – it has disappeared,” she added.

“That has allowed these companies to continue to engage and grow in these markets while not being blamed for the censorship.”

York believes that these companies should be incredibly limited in how they regulate speech.

Another problem, she says, is that these companies consider the Middle East as a single monolithic entity and fail to look at the nuances between different countries.

“It’s very culturally ignorant to think that Lebanese people would want the same rules as the Saudis,” she said.

“To give a concrete example of this, search engine Microsoft Bing for years censored its results in the entire Middle East based on what Saudi Arabia asked them to censor.”

As a result, York explained, Bing instituted a blanket ban for certain keywords in the whole Middle East, so, for example, because Saudi Arabia wanted all mentions of the word “breast” removed from search results, people in Lebanon were not able to use Bing to search for “chicken breast”.

Meanwhile, accessing pornographic websites directly was still possible in Lebanon.

“So, I think Twitter and all these other companies are responsible for when they say ‘yes’ whenever an authoritarian country comes to them to ask to censor certain speech.”

“These days they just do it, they don’t push back on it any more.”

Wael Abbas, an Egyptian human rights activist and blogger, used to document police brutality in Egypt.

“It’s quite clear from Abbas’s case that he was being attacked by trolls on Twitter that he alleges were government paid, but we don’t know that for sure,” York said.

“More and more we see people moving towards private platforms like WhatsApp, Signal or Telegram, which all provide more privacy.”

MOHAMAD NAJEM, SMEX

“Nevertheless, he was attacked by government supporters on Twitter, he fought back and then his account was shut down by Twitter, probably because he used language that was in their rules considered hate speech.”

His account remains suspended.

“In Wael’s example, they should not have kicked him off of the platform for using harsh language,” York said.

These sustained efforts have instilled fear among activists, many of whom have largely moved away from public platforms like Twitter and Facebook to more closed systems.

“More and more we see people moving towards private platforms like WhatsApp, Signal or Telegram, which all provide more privacy,” Najem said.

While the increased privacy of closed platforms provides some more safety for activists, reaching an audience as they did during the Arab Spring seems impossible.

Saudi women’s rights activist Souad al-Shammary looks at her Twitter account on her mobile phone. She is a liberal feminist who was jailed for her views [File: AP]

Article

GO RED China! GO RED China!