AG Abbott Letter to Obama – ‘I Told You So’

Editor’s Note – When we ask if we are secure on our borders, the current administration tells us we are safer than we have ever been. The arrests are up and the illegal immigration is down. Janet Napolitano said:

“There is a perception that the border is worse now than it ever has been,” Napolitano said at the Bridge of The Americas border crossing in El Paso, Texas, the Associated Press reports. “That is wrong. The border is better now than it ever has been.”

However, the people who live in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California know better. Just ask Sheriff Paul Babeu of Pinal County Arizona who is calling for Holder’s resignation, or in this case, the Attorney General of Texas. Read what the AG of Texas has to say to Obama:

Greg Abbott Tells Obama to PROTECT US NOW after Texas Officer Shot by Mexican Drug Cartel on Border

By David Bellow

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott

Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott sent a letter to President Obama on November 2nd, 2011. The letter had a clear message.

I TOLD YOU SO!

Greg Abbott has been pleading for the Obama Administration to take action to protect the Texas Border from these violent Drug Cartels. The Drug Cartels have killed tens of thousands of innocent victims and now the Drug Cartel violence is spilling onto the American side. Earlier this year I posted a video of a battle that happened on the border across from Roma, TX. The explosions and gunfire were easily seen and heard from the Texas side. I have also written articles detailing shootouts between the Drug Cartels and Texas Law enforcement and also about how Texas children are being recruited and killed by Mexican drug cartels.

Greg Abbott warned President Obama that soon these Drug Cartel bullets will harm Americans on the Texas side of the Border.

Sure enough, Greg Abbott was right.

A Texas Deputy was shot 3 times in a shootout last weekend.

Following this recent incident, Greg Abbott sent a letter to President Obama pleading for him to take action to protect Americans by protecting the Border. He used this recent incident as his example.

Below is the Letter that Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott sent to President Obama on November 2nd, 2011:

Dear Mr. President,

Over a year ago, I wrote to you warning of the increasing threat of cartel-related violence spilling across our border with Mexico. At the time, gunfire from cartels in Juarez had crossed over the border into El Paso. Fortunately for El Pasoans, those bullets struck only buildings, rather than bodies. But as I warned back then, we cannot simply rely on good fortune to protect American lives from the ever-present threat of cartel violence on our southern border. Since the incident in El Paso, the threat from the cartels has only grown—and now the bullets have struck Americans. Just last weekend, in a deadly shootout with cartel operatives, a deputy sheriff in Hidalgo County, Texas, was shot three times. Thankfully the officer survived, but the Hidalgo County Sheriff confirmed that the shooting spilled over from ongoing drug wars involving the Gulf Cartel in Mexico.

Unfortunately, last week’s gun battle in Hidalgo County was not an isolated incident. In January of this year, highway workers repairing a road near a known drug-smuggling route were fired upon from the southern side of the border near Fort Hancock, Texas. In June, Texas law enforcement officers near Abram, Texas, exchanged fire with drug smugglers who attacked them from across the border. In May, U.S. Border Patrol agents near Mission, Texas, also came under fire under similar circumstances. And in September, one man was killed when cartel operatives exchanged gunfire between vehicles driving down a highway in McAllen, Texas.

Within just the last two weeks, three high-level cartel leaders have been arrested inside the United States. Reports indicate they were hiding in Texas in an attempt to avoid violence in Mexico. But the violence is already starting to follow these criminals to the United States, as the increasing cartel activity in South Texas demonstrates. Their presence in our country is more evidence that the cartels increasingly view the porous border as no more than a line on a map. And if your Administration continues to fail to secure the border against this threat, it is only a matter of time before American lives are lost.

I implore you to aggressively confront this escalating threat. The safety and security of the Americans you have pledged to defend is at risk because of the cartel battles spilling across our border. To protect American lives, your administration must immediately dedicate more manpower to border security—especially along the 1,254 mile Texas border, which remains unacceptably porous. Texas and its law enforcement personnel at the state, county and local levels remain committed to working with your Administration to maintain the highest level of public safety. We ask that you collaborate with us to accomplish that goal before more American blood is lost.

I look forward to your response.

Sincerely,

Greg Abbott

Attorney General of Texas

Fast & Furious – Mexico still waiting for answers

Editor’s Note: We have a State Department, a CIA, and a DoJ that have ignored any and all responses to Mexico and their leadership when it comes to running guns and murders south of the border as a result of the broken and ill-managed operation known as “Gunwalker”, also named “Fast and Furious”. The DoJ is at the core of this operation and has been under Congressional investigation due to at least two murders of Border Agents and perhaps up to as many as 250 murders of innocent Mexican victims. It is a curious wonder why there has been no criminal investigation launched as this is, in fact, murder on an international landscape. What is more puzzling is the United Nations has not asked any questions. Fast and Furious is/was a program financed by Stimulus money, which is managed by Vice President Joe Biden and requires the full support and attention of citizens is aiding the Commission chairperson, Congressman Darrel Issa of the Oversight Committee.

Sacramento Bee

By KEN ELLINGWOOD, RICHARD A. SERRANO AND TRACY WILKINSON

Last fall’s slaying of Mario Gonzalez, the brother of a Mexican state prosecutor, shocked people on both sides of the border. Sensational news reports revealed that cartel hit men had tortured Gonzalez, and forced him to make a videotaped “confession” that his high-powered sister was on the take.

Mario Gonzalez - Tortured Brother of Former Mexican Atty. General

But American authorities concealed one disturbing fact about the case from their Mexican counterparts: U.S. federal agents had allowed AK-47 assault rifles later found in the killers’ arsenal to be smuggled across the border under the notorious Fast and Furious gun-trafficking program.

U.S. officials also kept mum as other weapons linked to Fast and Furious turned up at dozens of additional Mexican crime scenes, with a reported toll of at least 150 people killed or wounded.

Months after the deadly lapses in the program were revealed in the U.S. media – prompting congressional hearings and the resignation of the acting chief of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives – top Mexican officials say American authorities have still not offered them a proper accounting of what went wrong.

Marisela Morales, Mexico’s attorney general and a longtime favorite of American law enforcement agents in Mexico, told the Los Angeles Times that she first learned about Fast and Furious from news reports. And to this day, she said, U.S. officials have not briefed her on the operation gone awry, nor have they apologized.

“At no time did we know or were we made aware that there might have been arms trafficking permitted,” Morales, Mexico’s highest-ranking law enforcement official, said in a recent interview. “In no way would we have allowed it because it is an attack on the safety of Mexicans.”

Morales said she did not want to draw conclusions before the outcome of U.S. investigations, but that deliberately letting weapons “walk” into Mexico would represent a “betrayal” of a country enduring a drug war that has killed more than 40,000 people.

Concealment of the bloody toll of Fast and Furious took place despite official pronouncements of growing cooperation and intelligence-sharing in the fight against vicious Mexican drug-trafficking organizations. The secrecy also occurred as Mexican President Felipe Calderon and other senior Mexican officials complained bitterly, time and again, about the flow of weapons into Mexico from the U.S.

Patricia Gonzalez, the top state prosecutor in Chihuahua at the time of her brother’s 2010 kidnapping, noted that she had worked closely with U.S. officials for years and was stunned that she did not learn until many months later, through media reports, about the link between his death and Fast and Furious weapons.

“The basic ineptitude of these officials (who ordered the Fast and Furious operation) caused the death of my brother and surely thousands more victims,” Gonzalez said.

Fast and Furious weapons have also been linked to other high-profile shootings. On May 24, a helicopter ferrying Mexican federal police during an operation in the western state of Michoacan was forced to land after bullets from a powerful Barrett .50-caliber rifle pierced its fuselage and armor-reinforced windshield. Three officers were wounded.

Authorities later captured dozens of drug-gang gunmen involved in the attack and seized 70 weapons, including a Barrett rifle, according to a report by U.S. congressional committees. Some of the guns were traced to Fast and Furious.

Email traffic and U.S. congressional testimony by ATF agents and others make clear the existence of a determined, yearlong effort by American officials to conceal from Mexico’s government details of the operation, launched in November 2009 by the ATF field offices in Arizona and New Mexico.

In March 2010, with a growing number of guns lost or showing up at crime scenes in Mexico, ATF officials convened an “emergency briefing” to figure out a way to shut down Fast and Furious. Instead, they decided to keep it going and continue to leave Mexico out of the loop.

Communications also show that the U.S. Embassy, including the ATF office in Mexico, at least initially, was also kept in the dark.

In July 2010, Darren Gil, the acting ATF attache in Mexico City, asked his supervisors in the U.S. about guns in Mexico, but got no answer, according to his testimony before a U.S. congressional committee investigating the matter.

“They were afraid that I was going to either brief the ambassador, or brief the government of Mexico officials on it,” Gil said.

Part of the reason for not telling Mexican authorities, Gil and others noted, is widespread official corruption in Mexico that has long made some U.S. officials reluctant to share intelligence. By late last year, however, with the kidnapping of Mario Gonzalez and tracing of the AK-47s, some ATF officials were beginning to tell their superiors that it was time to come clean.

Carlos Canino, an ATF agent at the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City, warned headquarters that failure to share the information would have dire consequences for the U.S.-Mexican relationship.

“We need to tell them (Mexico) this, because if we don’t tell them this, and this gets out, it was my opinion that the Mexicans would never trust us again,” Canino testified to congressional investigators in Washington.

Attorney General Morales said it was not until January that the Mexican government was told of the existence of an undercover program that turned out to be Fast and Furious. At the time, Morales said, Mexico was not provided details.

In March, after disgruntled ATF agents went to congressional investigators, details of Fast and Furious began to appear in the Times and other U.S. media. By then, two Fast and Furious weapons had been found at the scene of the fatal shooting of a U.S. border agent near Rio Rico, Ariz., and a second agent had been killed near the Mexican city of San Luis Potosi.

The latter death, of federal ICE agent Jaime Zapata, sent ATF hierarchy into a “state of panic,” ATF supervisor Peter Forcelli said, because of fears the weapons used might have arrived in Mexico as part of Fast and Furious. So far, all the U.S. government has said in the Zapata case is that one of the weapons was traced to an illegal purchase in the Dallas area.

In June, Canino, the ATF attache, was finally allowed to say something to Attorney General Morales about the weapons used by Mario Gonzalez’s captors, thought to be members of the powerful Sinaloa cartel.

“I wanted her to find out from me, because she is an ally of the U.S. government,” he testified.

Canino later told congressional investigators that Morales was shocked.

“Hijole!” he recalled her saying, an expression that roughly means, “Oh no!”

Canino testified that Fast and Furious guns showed up at a total of nearly 200 crime scenes.

Mexican Congressman Humberto Benitez Trevino, who heads the justice committee in the Chamber of Deputies, said the number of people killed or wounded by the weapons had probably doubled to 300 since March, when he said confidential information held by Mexican security authorities put the figure at 150. The higher number, he said, was his own estimate.

A former attorney general, Benitez labeled the operation a “failure,” but said it did not spell collapse in the two nations’ shared fight against organized-crime groups.

“It was a bad business that got out of hand,” he said in an interview.

Many Mexican politicians responded angrily when the existence of the program became known in March, with several saying it amounted to a breach of Mexican sovereignty. But much of that anger has subsided, possibly in the interest of not aggravating the bilateral relationship. For Mexico, the gun problem goes far beyond the Fast and Furious program. Of weapons used in crimes and traced, more than 75 percent come from the U.S.

“Yes it was bad and wrong, and you have to ask yourself, what were they thinking?” a senior official in Calderon’s administration said, referring to Fast and Furious. “But, given the river of weapons that flows into Mexico from the U.S., do a few more make a big difference?”

Still, Mexican leaders are under pressure to answer questions from their citizens, with very little to go on.

“The evidence is over there (north of the border),” Morales said. “I can’t put a pistol to their heads and say, ‘Now give it to me or else.’ I can’t.”

(Los Angeles Times staff writers Ellingwood and Wilkinson reported from Mexico and Serrano from Washington.)

Mexican Drug Cartels: The Battle Against Evil

Policemag.com

by Paul Chabot

Civilized societies from every order are under siege from the most vicious and brutal organizations of our lifetime. Drug cartels are thriving. Terrorist and pirate networks are expanding. Sophisticated prison gangs manage legions of violent street gangs. And ruthless organized crime syndicates breed new underworlds of horror.

Like a plague, organized evil is spreading out of control. Chaos is everywhere — the time to fight back is running out. Good and dark forces have locked horns; the future of the free-world as we know it is in jeopardy.

I propose a new strategy to implement on the battlefield, a strategy that helps us better learn firsthand the tactics and resilience of evil, and most importantly, how we can fight back and turn the tide for humanity.

I recently released a book, “Eternal Battle Against Evil,” that explores the nature of organizational resilience as it applies to these sinister organizations. The process is simple — we must first better know our enemy, and in doing so, we can look at history’s most notorious drug cartels that are formally known as drug trafficking organizations (DTOs). What does it take for a DTO to remain resilient and thrive in a world of constant change and uncertainty? Despite a full-fledged war against the major DTOs, why have the U.S. and Mexico not been able to fully dismantle these organizations?

An in-depth examination of the key elements of organizational resilience will help provide answers to this question. In particular, this will be accomplished through a brutal account of the Arellano-Felix DTO and the dismantling efforts made by the U.S. and Mexican governments. The Arellano-Felix DTO was one of the most violent of the Mexican DTOs (although today largely diminished).

This key to fighting evil of all sorts is simply to understand what keeps it alive, so we can better replicate our successful efforts against terror networks, pirates, gangs and organized crime. Like a heat-seeking missile, the good must focus on those sustaining pillars of the enemy’s strength to destroy the tentacles of the serpent.

I didn’t truly understand what made up these evil organizations until I was sent to Iraq to work with the joint special operation forces targeting the highest level of the Al-Qaeda leadership. For the eight years leading up to this, my life was immersed in studying the makeup and resilience of one of the world’s most notorious criminal enterprises. What astonished me in Iraq was how similar the Al-Qaeda organizational structure was to those of drug trafficking organizations.

The further I explored, the more shocking the truth became — evil does have a face, a body, and a remarkably strong structure built to prevent failure.

To tear apart evil, we must simply reverse-engineer its strenghts. We identify those evil, resilient characteristics and then correctly align our resources (such as the military, law enforcement and civilian assets) against them, and fight like hell.

The evils we face — violence, intimidation, and corruption — have steadily escalated over the years. Beheadings, mass murders, and Al-Qaeda-style car bombs have become part of life in certain areas of Mexico. For America, terror is at our doorsteps and is creeping into our shadows. Without a new strategy to fight this war, drug cartels and every other evil organization around the globe will present a bleak future for the free world.

The time is at hand to fight back — not only here, but in every corner of the Earth where sinister organizations raise their ugly heads. Evil shares similar traits, motives, skills, structures and personalities. Make no mistake. These are sinister organizations in their purest form, stretching their claws to perfect chaos globally.

These tactics of chaos have long been used by drug lords to instill fear. This is the spread of the cancer known as “narco-terrorism.” Perhaps we thought, and hoped, this evil would never rise to this level so close to home. We were taught that these things only take place on the streets of the Middle East, in Iraq and Afghanistan, perhaps even Colombia. Joint governmental efforts have been battling drug lords since the early 1980s, but not in Mexico and not along the border in the measures required today. It’s unthinkable that this evil trespasses into our own backyard and threatens our national security.

Time is short; we must move now and fight in both the light and shadows, never ever giving up, because giving up seals the fate of humanity as we know it. We must strike now! We have reached critical mass. It is time for a global “call to action,” led by America, to take down the mightiest of the Goliaths so our children may inherit a safer world.

Paul Chabot is the author of the book “Eternal Battle Against Evil,” and president of Chabot Strategies.

Expert: Drug gangs control half of Mexico

From Fox News Latino

Mexico City – Violent crime has become a problem of national security in Mexico, where half of the territory is outside of state control and “we’re in the hands of the narcos,” an intelligence expert and author of a new book on Mexico’s public safety woes, said.

Jorge Carrillo Olea, founder of Mexico’s leading intelligence center, said the“state has lost territorial control, and therefore governability,” over roughly 50 percent of the country.

The government has been incapable of fully enforcing the law and ensuring justice is upheld, said Carrillo, who spoke to Efe while in Mexico City to promote his new book, “Mexico en riesgo; una vision personal sobre un Estado a la defensive” (Mexico at Risk: A Personal Vision of a State on the Defensive), published this year by Grijalbo.

mexicocartelmap

Carrillo, who in 1989 founded the Center for Research and National Security, or Cisen, a civil entity overseen by the interior ministry, said Mexico’s crime and public safety problems will last for decades because the society has “reached a point of no return.” He said the country has neglected to combat money laundering and weapons trafficking to avoid stepping on the toes of big Mexican and foreign capitalists, particularly from the United States.

Mexico has shirked its commitment to halt this traffic and “things go no further than empty rhetoric,” said Carrillo, who formerly held top posts in the country’s public administration.

Governments also have undermined the nation’s sovereignty with their policies, ceding authority to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration and the FBI – “who act like lords and owners in our country” – and even openly requesting assistance from the United States, he said.

The national security expert said drug gangs receive huge profit margins on their business and their battles for control of territory can pose enormous national security risks to countries like Mexico.

Cartels have weapons to combat Mexican security forces, although “with enormous losses for (the gangs)” because they recruit young men without military training, “give them an AK-47 and they use it as if they were watering a garden,” Carrillo said. The expert said that although the army keeps killing young men recruited by drug mobs, these groups will continue to find more impoverished persons willing to earn between 8,000 and 12,000 pesos ($650-$970) a month and gain a sense of power, obtain women and defy authority.

“If policies are measured by their results, there haven’t been any positive results so far. Even though the authorities say they’ve decapitated the (criminal) organizations, these have multiplied and extended (their reach),” Carrillo, who also once served as governor of the central state of Morelos, said.

Only the formal structures have changed and President Felipe Calderon’s 2006-2012 administration will conclude with some 50,000 drug-related deaths, according to the expert, who worked closely with the previous administrations of Luis Echeverria, 1970-1976; Jose Lopez Portillo, 1976-1982; Miguel de la Madrid, 1982-1988; and Carlos Salinas, 1988-1994.

More than 40,000 deaths attributed mainly to turf battles among the cartels and clashes between gangsters and the security forces already have occurred since Calderon took office in late 2006.

While the president’s militarization of the drug war has led to high-profile arrests and slayings of drug lords, it also has coincided with a sharp increase in drug-related violence. The growth of the cartels also has sparked a rise in the number of small-time criminal outfits who commit robberies, kidnappings and, especially acts of extortion, against law-abiding citizens, Carrillo said.

Referring to Cisen, the expert said that its original mission was to create a national security system to safeguard the Mexican state but that in recent years it has been placed at the service of each successive administration. He added that previous intelligence agencies, such as the Federal Security Directorate, had always acted as espionage mechanisms that defended the administration in power from subversive threats.

In that regard, he said Mexico must establish a National State Security policy that is enshrined “in the constitution and other laws, create awareness in Congress and among the citizenry so they monitor its enforcement and prevent it from being changed (with each new president) every six years.”

“We’ve passed the point of no return and no president,” regardless of party affiliation, can do much to solve the security woes, Carrillo said, adding that Calderon’s successor will have to have a “very serious, large team in place to analyze and tackle the problem.”

But “that won’t satisfy people,” the expert predicted. He therefore called for a grand national alliance that promotes long-term solutions, which he said must be in the hands of institutions, not individual.