Who are the real "Fat-Cats"?

SUA Staff – The mantra is constant from this White House, and throughout the Democratic Party talking points – Republicans are ‘fat-cats’ who just support get-rich millionaires and billionaires. The Democrats are for the ‘working families’.

Everyday it echos throughout the internet and in the media. No speech of late goes without some statement about ‘fair share’ or similar leftist slogans. Even the Occupy Wall Street people echo this, and now they are preparing for a May Day event.

There is one major problem with their mantra – its the left who is in bed with “Big”-this, and “Big”-that, and so on.

When you look at the names that have the most access to the Washington elites and power, including the White House, it’s a far different story. We all know both parties do this, or so that too is part of the mantra, but why, because to a great many of them, its not about ‘public service’, it was always about power and riches. Serve a post in DC, reap the benefits later.

Recently, SUA was shown a set of pictorials called Venn-Diagrams, compiled and posted in January of 2011, but most were updated as late as last December. These are diagrams that show a name, their government association, and also where they came from in industry. Some of the names have changed, but in large measure, it totally de-bunks the mantra, the myth, that the Democrats are for the little guy, and Republicans are for the ‘fat-cats’.

SUA is re-posting them so you can talk with your peers about the truth during this campaign season. Obama and the left paint Romney as that Bain-Capital ‘fat-cat’, but by our count, in these 18 diagrams, 249 people are listed. That is a lot of powerful positions, right up to the White House and the halls of Congress. That is not a surprise, the real surprise is that of the total, 230 are working for, or were appointed by a Democrat after leaving their old posts in one of the 18 categories. Only 19 are on the other side of the aisle.

These 18 industries are common names in politics and include, Big Tobacco, Motion Picture Association of America, Social Network sites, Planned Parenthood, the AFL-CIO union, Disney, Fannie Mae, Green Energy, the Defense Contractors, Enron, Keystone Pipeline, Comcast, Big Media, Big Oil, Big Pharma, General Electric (GE), Monsanto and Goldman-Sachs.

Another set of surprises: the folks at Enron, erroneously associated with former President Bush’s cronies, has more former employees in DC working for or with Democrats. Then there is Goldman-Sachs, where Jon Corzine of MF Global infamy came from.

Madison Ruppert at End the Lies wrote:

This phenomenal series of Venn diagrams shows in painstaking detail just how corrupted our political system in the United States has become.

When I look at the the connections of Goldman Sachs, it makes me wonder how anyone thought that people actually had the brazenness to claim that those pointing out the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington conspiracy theorists.

Thankfully, as is often the case, the so-called “Government Sachs” conspiracy theorists were right all along, and when it is laid out as it is above it makes it obvious why this is the case. These are perfect visual representations of how what should be our government has become a government that serves corporate interests to the detriment of the American people.

Take the White House’s move to block the release of a Monsanto-linked lobbyist’s e-mail, for instance. This is hardly shocking when one considers the numerous connections the global corporation enjoys on Capitol Hill shown above. Even when the products they are hawking are linked to birth defects and necrosis, these individuals seem to have no problem with actively circumventing everything democracy is supposed to be in order to pursue their corporate interests.

Just like the thoroughly reprehensible activities of the war profiteers who knowingly profit off of death, destruction and suffering, those who lobby for corporations like Monsanto are actively contributing to the problems of the many for the benefit of the few. It’s truly disturbing to see all of this laid out in such an easily comprehensible manner, especially when one observes the high level positions many of these individuals either once held or currently hold.

Of course, this is only a small portion of the individuals involved in the widespread corporatist corruption that has infected so much of the United States.

The cart before the horse – Green Energy vs. Energy Independence

By Scott W. Winchell, Editor

The forced idealism of weaning the nation off of petroleum dependence through green energy endeavors is a serious drain on our flagging economy, it is placing the economic cart before the energy horse. At some point in the future, technology and science may catch up to idealism in terms of “green energy” but as we see today, the costs far outweigh the benefits. Progressives are however, putting that cart before the horse and one must ask why. The answer seems to lean toward lining one’s own pockets and gaining power, both selfish endeavors, and certainly not in the best interest of all Americans, and the stability of our Republic.

There is junk science, climate zealotry bordering on religious faith, poor economic timing, and confiscatory investment that wastes tax-dollars we do not have on pay-to-play projects such as Solyndra. This is way beyond pork barrel projects, some say criminally so, and they are likely correct!

The Bakken Formation

At a time where jobs are non-existent, debt is unimaginable, and our economy and way of life are dependent on energy stability, we cannot change the horse amid stream and watch the cart float away into the rapids of economic ruin. That euphemistic cart is our dependence on oil and gas. Its a fact, and the only way to wean ourselves off is to employ a cost effective methodology where the proper steps are taken, in logical and efficient order.

We did not become dependent on oil over night, and much more than energy comes from petroleum products. We must first stabilize the cart, become petroleum energy and product independent, and then when the dollar is once again king, and we are much safer as a nation from global threats, may we invest in finding ways for solar, wind, geo-thermal, safe nuclear, and who knows what else as the most resourceful nation ever sets its mind and capitalistic engine to the prospect of finding alternative energy to supplant oil.

Open ANWR, Drill-Baby-Drill! Get the EPA out of our way; we have enough regulations already. Here is one grand example of how we can succeed, and no one is saying get rid of all the rules, conservatives also breath air and drink water. Conservatives are, much opposed to conventional Progressive accusations, environmentally aware, and active.

How North Dakota Became Saudi Arabia

Stephen Moore Wall Street Journal Weekend Interview

Harold Hamm, the Oklahoma-based founder and CEO of Continental Resources, the 14th-largest oil company in America, is a man who thinks big. He came to Washington last month to spread a needed message of economic optimism: With the right set of national energy policies, the United States could be “completely energy independent by the end of the decade. We can be the Saudi Arabia of oil and natural gas in the 21st century.”

“President Obama is riding the wrong horse on energy,” he adds. We can’t come anywhere near the scale of energy production to achieve energy independence by pouring tax dollars into “green energy” sources like wind and solar, he argues. It has to come from oil and gas.

You’d expect an oilman to make the “drill, baby, drill” pitch. But since 2005 America truly has been in the midst of a revolution in oil and natural gas, which is the nation’s fastest-growing manufacturing sector. No one is more responsible for that resurgence than Mr. Hamm. He was the original discoverer of the gigantic and prolific Bakken oil fields of Montana and North Dakota that have already helped move the U.S. into third place among world oil producers.

How much oil does Bakken have? The official estimate of the U.S. Geological Survey a few years ago was between four and five billion barrels. Mr. Hamm disagrees: “No way. We estimate that the entire field, fully developed, in Bakken is 24 billion barrels.”

If he’s right, that’ll double America’s proven oil reserves. “Bakken is almost twice as big as the oil reserve in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska,” he continues. According to Department of Energy data, North Dakota is on pace to surpass California in oil production in the next few years. Mr. Hamm explains over lunch in Washington, D.C., that the more his company drills, the more oil it finds. Continental Resources has seen its “proved reserves” of oil and natural gas (mostly in North Dakota) skyrocket to 421 million barrels this summer from 118 million barrels in 2006.

“We expect our reserves and production to triple over the next five years.” And for those who think this oil find is only making Mr. Hamm rich, he notes that today in America “there are 10 million royalty owners across the country” who receive payments for the oil drilled on their land. “The wealth is being widely shared.”

One reason for the renaissance has been OPEC’s erosion of market power. “For nearly 50 years in this country nobody looked for oil here and drilling was in steady decline. Every time the domestic industry picked itself up, the Saudis would open the taps and drown us with cheap oil,” he recalls. “They had unlimited production capacity, and company after company would go bust.”

Today OPEC’s market share is falling and no longer dictates the world price. This is huge, Mr. Hamm says. “Finally we have an opportunity to go out and explore for oil and drill without fear of price collapse.” When OPEC was at its peak in the 1990s, the U.S. imported about two-thirds of its oil. Now we import less than half of it, and about 40% of what we do import comes from Mexico and Canada. That’s why Mr. Hamm thinks North America can achieve oil independence.

The other reason for America’s abundant supply of oil and natural gas has been thedevelopment of new drilling techniques. “Horizontal drilling” allows rigs to reach two miles into the ground and then spread horizontally by thousands of feet. Mr. Hamm was one of the pioneers of this method in the 1990s, and it has done for the oil industry what hydraulic fracturing has done for natural gas drilling in places like the Marcellus Shale in the Northeast. Both innovations have unlocked decades worth of new sources of domestic fossil fuels that previously couldn’t be extracted at affordable cost.

Mr. Hamm’s rags to riches success is the quintessential “only in America” story. He was the last of 13 kids, growing up in rural Oklahoma “the son of sharecroppers who never owned land.” He didn’t have money to go to college, so as a teenager he went to work in the oil fields and developed a passion. “I always wanted to find oil. It was always an irresistible calling.”

He became a wildcat driller and his success rate became legendary in the industry. “People started to say I have ESP,” he remarks. “I was fortunate, I guess. Next year it will be 45 years in the business.”

Mr. Hamm ranks 33rd on the Forbes wealth list for America, but given the massive amount of oil that he owns, much still in the ground, and the dizzying growth of Continental’s output and profits (up 34% last year alone), his wealth could rise above $20 billion and he could soon be rubbing elbows with the likes of Warren Buffett.

His only beef these days is with Washington. Mr. Hamm was invited to the White House for a “giving summit” with wealthy Americans who have pledged to donate at least half their wealth to charity. (He’s given tens of millions of dollars already to schools like Oklahoma State and for diabetes research.) “Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, they were all there,” he recalls.

When it was Mr. Hamm’s turn to talk briefly with President Obama, “I told him of the revolution in the oil and gas industry and how we have the capacity to produce enough oil to enable America to replace OPEC. I wanted to make sure he knew about this.”

The president’s reaction? “He turned to me and said, ‘Oil and gas will be important for the next few years. But we need to go on to green and alternative energy. [Energy] Secretary [Steven] Chu has assured me that within five years, we can have a battery developed that will make a car with the equivalent of 130 miles per gallon.'” Mr. Hamm holds his head in his hands and says, “Even if you believed that, why would you want to stop oil and gas development? It was pretty disappointing.”

Washington keeps “sticking a regulatory boot at our necks and then turns around and asks: ‘Why aren’t you creating more jobs,'” he says. He roils at the Interior Department delays of months and sometimes years to get permits for drilling. “These delays kill projects,” he says. Even the Securities and Exchange Commission is now tightening the screws on the oil industry, requiring companies like Continental to report their production and federal royalties on thousands of individual leases under the Sarbanes-Oxley accounting rules. “I could go to jail because a local operator misreported the production in the field,” he says.

The White House proposal to raise $40 billion of taxes on oil and gas—by excluding those industries from credits that go to all domestic manufacturers—is also a major hindrance to exploration and drilling. “That just stops the drilling,” Mr. Hamm believes. “I’ve seen these things come about before, like [Jimmy] Carter’s windfall profits tax.” He says America’s rig count on active wells went from 4,500 to less than 55 in a matter of months. “That was a dumb idea. Thank God, Reagan got rid of that.”

A few months ago the Obama Justice Department brought charges against Continental and six other oil companies in North Dakota for causing the death of 28 migratory birds, in violation of the Migratory Bird Act. Continental’s crime was killing one bird “the size of a sparrow” in its oil pits. The charges carry criminal penalties of up to six months in jail. “It’s not even a rare bird. There’re jillions of them,” he explains. He says that “people in North Dakota are really outraged by these legal actions,” which he views as “completely discriminatory” because the feds have rarely if ever prosecuted the Obama administration’s beloved wind industry, which kills hundreds of thousands of birds each year.

Continental pleaded not guilty to the charges last week in federal court. For Mr. Hamm the whole incident is tantamount to harassment. “This shouldn’t happen in America,” he says. To him the case is further proof that Washington “is out to get us.”

Mr. Hamm believes that if Mr. Obama truly wants more job creation, he should studyNorth Dakota, the state with the lowest unemployment rate in the nation at 3.5%. He swears that number is overstated: “We can’t find any unemployed people up there. The state has 18,000 unfilled jobs,” Mr. Hamm insists. “And these are jobs that pay $60,000 to $80,000 a year.” The economy is expanding so fast that North Dakota has a housing shortage. Thanks to the oil boom—Continental pays more than $50 million in state taxes a year—the state has a budget surplus and is considering ending income and property taxes.

It’s hard to disagree with Mr. Hamm’s assessment that Barack Obama has the energy story in America wrong. The government floods green energy—a niche market that supplies 2.5% of our energy needs—with billions of dollars of subsidies a year. “Wind isn’t commercially feasible with natural gas prices below $6” per thousand cubic feet, notes Mr. Hamm. Right now its price is below $4. This may explain the administration’s hostility to the fossil-fuel renaissance.

Mr. Hamm calculates that if Washington would allow more drilling permits for oil and natural gas on federal lands and federal waters, “I truly believe the federal government could over time raise $18 trillion in royalties.” That’s more than the U.S. national debt, I say. He smiles.

This estimate sounds implausibly high, but Mr. Hamm has a lifelong habit of proving skeptics wrong. And even if he’s wrong by half, it’s a stunning number to think about. So this America-first energy story isn’t just about jobs and economic revival. It’s also about repairing America’s battered balance sheet. Someone should get this man in front of the congressional deficit-reduction super committee.

Mr. Moore is a member of the Journal’s editorial board.

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