Warsaw, RED China: For 12 Weeks Hong Kong Protesters Refuse to Toe the Line

 

Pleading Hong Kong protester draws comparisons to Tiananmen Square’s ‘Tank Man’

Photos and video of an unarmed Hong Kong protester pleading with a cop who has her pistol drawn have gone viral on social media — with users drawing comparisons to the iconic “Tank Man” from the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989.

“Different Places. Same Tactics. Two Heros [sic],” wrote one person on Twitter, who dubbed the Hong Kong protester “Pistol Man.”

Carrying nothing but an umbrella, the demonstrator can be seen in video and photos — one captured by Lam Yik Fei of the New York Times — facing off with a female officer. She appears to point her gun in his direction as he yells something at her.

Lam, a photographer for the Times, said he saw the clash unfold on Sunday night following a peaceful protest in the Tsuen Wan area of Hong Kong. Demonstrators were clutching umbrellas — a symbol of the ongoing resistance movement — and being ordered back by the police. It was reportedly the first time cops used weapons with live ammunition to deter the crowds.

At one point, an officer fired off a warning shot into the air — sparking the protesters to retreat and beg for their lives. “Pistol Man” was one of them.

“He said, ‘Don’t shoot,’” Lam recalled, noting how the middle-aged man dropped to his knees. Video shows him being kicked by the female officer moments later.

Police officials later claimed at a press conference that the cop’s response was out of “natural instinct.” They said that officers had pulled their guns after being attacked by the demonstrators.

“Six officers drew their service weapons because their lives were under threat,” Senior Superintendent Yolanda Yu told reporters.

Social media users, however, were bashing Chinese authorities for the show of force — and praising the protester for his “bravery.”

“He was standing between protesters, reporters and police officers (who pulled out their guns), shouting ‘Don’t shoot! Don’t shoot them!’” tweeted Cantopop singer and actress Denise Ho. “Greatest respect towards this fellow Hongkonger. Salute!”

The unidentified demonstrator drew countless comparisons to the “Tank Man” from the Tiananmen Square protests in Beijing, who was also never identified. The images of his confrontation with a group of tanks leaving Tiananmen Square were widely shared and published in both Time and Life magazines.

The “Pistol Man” incident wrapped up a wild weekend of protests — which resulted in 86 people, including one as young as 12, being thrown behind bars.

The pro-democracy demonstrations first erupted over opposition to a since-suspended extradition bill that would have enabled the country’s criminal suspects to be extradited to mainland China for trial. They are now entering their 12th week.

 

Red China Warns Global CEOs: Toe the Party Line on Hong Kong

China Warns Global CEOs: Toe the Party Line on Hong Kong

Editor’s Note: Letting them off again…fore a reason… Welcome to “The International” Toe the line with fascism and the New World Order or re-education for you! Got a kidney? One World, One Dream.

 
 
As anti-government protests in Hong Kong intensified this month, KPMG issued a directive to its employees in the city: Don’t speak on behalf of the company in public. It went on to say that the firm supports China’s policy for governing Hong Kong.

PwC, another Big Four accounting giant, sent a similar message to staff telling them to avoid disclosing anything about the company on social media platforms, according to emails seen by Bloomberg.

This is the new reality for multinational businesses that have long grappled with a thorny question on China: What’s the price of access to Asia’s biggest economy? Beijing’s response to the protests, most notably its clampdown on Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. this month, has provided one answer: compliance with the Communist Party’s worldview, from senior management on down.

“The Chinese government doesn’t see business as being separate from the state and it has made it clear that if you want to do business in China, you’d better toe the line,” said Steve Vickers, chief executive officer of political and corporate risk consultancy Steve Vickers & Associates, and the former head of the Royal Hong Kong Police Criminal Intelligence Bureau.
PwC said in an Aug. 5 statement that it fully respects people’s right to freedom of speech, but regrets the escalation of violence related to the protests. The firm also condemned “the use of social media to spread false messages using the firm’s corporate identity” that it said were designed to mislead the public.

KPMG emailed its Hong Kong staff on Thursday reminding them not to engage in unlawful acts whether they’re at work or not and to refrain from speaking to the media without prior approval, according to a copy of the message seen by Bloomberg. KPMG didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

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The 1 1 th Week: ‘Protect the students’: Hong Kong teachers join protests

‘Protect the students’: Hong Kong teachers join protests

Ahead of a new school year, teachers raise concerns about their students’ safety amid ongoing mass protests.

by Casey Quackenbush

Hong Kong – Thousands of teachers braved hot, stormy weather on Saturday to march through downtown Hong Kong to denounce perceived government inaction and alleged police brutality against students protesting against the city’s extradition bill crisis, now pushing into its eleventh week.

Carrying umbrellas to battle vacillating heat and rain, teachers streamed up a main highway and snaked through a park chanting “protect the next generation of students!”

The protest began at a park called Chater Garden in downtown Hong Kong and was planned to end at the home of the city’s embattled leader Carrie Lam, but was redirected by police.

“As a teacher, we have to show our support to them,” said Carina Ma, a secondary school English teacher in her forties, who was marching on Saturday.

“If the teachers are not the role models to stand against the brutality and violence, we cannot teach our students well. So we must come out and stand up for them.”

The mood was both determined and angry, with some marchers waving their signs in front of police and chanting “Free Hong Kong!”

Teachers are the latest sector of society to join widespread demonstrations that have rocked the Chinese territory since early June.

What began as a protest against a now-shelved extradition bill that would allow suspects to be sent to mainland China has swelled into wider fury over Chinese interference into the affairs of the semi-autonomous territory.

While protesters have been demonstrating for nearly three months, the Beijing-backed government has refused to concede on any of the protesters’ five main demands, which include universal suffrage, full retraction of the bill, and amnesty for all arrested protesters.

Most demonstrations have been peaceful, but come nightfall fringe groups have often been seen clashing with police, triggering tear gas-filled chaos in the streets.

In the Mong Kok district on Saturday night, a second protest devolved, with black-clad protesters surrounding the police station, flashing laser pointers and throwing eggs at police.

Police fired a single rubber bullet after a protester threw a garbage bin onto a police van from a footbridge as the crowd dispersed.

Hong Kong police said on Thursday they had arrested at least 748 people since the protests began.

‘They feel really hopeless’

English teacher Ma said she was concerned for the safety of her students as well as their wellbeing, especially with the new school year approaching.

“I think most of them cannot focus in the lessons. They are so confused and angry and emotional,” she said, noting that many are dealing with political disagreement within their families. “At school, if we can’t make them feel supported and [listened to], they really feel hopeless”.

Ming Lam, 34, a clinical instructor, echoed the concerns.

“Definitely I worry about their studies because they spend much time fighting for Hong Kong freedom and democracy,” said Lam, fanning a baby strapped to her chest.

She said she also worried about her students being able to safely get to classes in different hospitals on weekends amid tear gas and roadblocks.

Academic Kristof Van den Troost said he feared what the “government is doing to Hong Kong” amid the ongoing protests.

“[We] keep going on even though the pressure is very high to stop and give up, because everything feels so hopeless,” said the 37-year-old Belgian native, who has lived in Hong Kong for 14 years.

“Things are quite nervous at the moment. We expect that there will be tensions on campus soon because the school year is going to start. Things are going to be very turbulent.”

Pro-government rally

Meanwhile, across the harbour on Hong Kong Island, a pro-police demonstration unfolded early on Saturday night in the waterfront park outside the legislative council building.

Thousands of government supporters streamed into the park, brandishing Chinese flags, giving thumbs-up to policemen, and taking pictures with the officers. Some wore light blue “I love HK police” t-shirts.

“[Hong Kong] is a mess. The rioters have gone beyond the line already,” said CS Ho, a 67-year-old lawyer and engineer.

“No matter how much we disagree with the government … [saying] ‘I disagree, I can do whatever I like.’ This is not rule of law.”

Ding Ding, a 50-year-old manager in commerce, said the people “need to protect Hong Kong”.

“We object to any violence. We are very angry. I’m one of the silent majority. We don’t want to come out and join any protests. We don’t like the protests going on. We want to keep Hong Kong peaceful,” said Ding.

Ding Ding called the recent airport protest where two mainland Chinese men were allegedly tied up and beaten by demonstrators “disgusting”. “This is not Hong Kong. They are not representing us.”

Police said about 100,000 people attended the pro-government rally.

‘Threats’ from Beijing

Beijing has also ramped up its rhetoric, saying the protests were showing signs of “terrorism” and releasing images of troop build-ups across the border in Shenzhen.

But some Hong Kongers remained unperturbed. “I don’t believe the Chinese government will do anything,” Lam said. “I think it’s only a threat”.

Van den Troost agreed that Chinese military intervention seemed unlikely. “It would be bad for China itself,” he said. “The main thing for Hong Kong is to stick to non-violent protests because we don’t want to give the mainland government an excuse to come here.”

“It’s always a possibility. During June 4, 1989, people didn’t expect that the army would crack down and they did, so you never know,” he said, referring to the iconic Tiananmen Square incident in Beijing.

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GO RED CHINA! GO RED CHINA! GO DAZIS! GO DAZIS!

“Fascism rides in from the left, not the right.” 

“History repeats itself. History is re levant.”

“Get ’em outta here!”

 

UK should give British nationality to Hong Kong citizens, Tugendhat says

 

UK should give British nationality to Hong Kong citizens, Tugendhat says

Move would be to reassure Hong Kong’s people rather than facing down Chinese threats, he says

The UK should give Hong Kong citizens full UK nationality as a means of reassurance amid the current standoff with Beijing, the chair of the influential Commons foreign affairs committee has argued.

Tom Tugendhat said this should have happened to people in the formerly British-ruled territory in 1997, when it was handed back to Chinese control, and that doing so now would reassure Hong Kong’s people that they were supported by the UK.

Hong Kong has been gripped by 10 weeks of large-scale and occasionally violent pro-democracy demonstrations, which have been met by a sometimes brutal police response, and increasingly trenchant threats from Beijing.

On Monday, two Chinese state media outlets ran video footage showing armoured personnel and troop carriers purportedly driving to Shenzhen, which borders Hong Kong, prompting concerns about military intervention.

Under the so-called “one country, two systems” arrangement that had Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule, Beijing considers the population to be Chinese nationals. However, a number of people in the territory hold what is known as a British national (overseas) passport, which gives some rights, for example to stay in the UK for up to six months, but no automatic ability to live permanently or work.

Tugendhat said: “The UK had obligations to Hong Kong citizens before 1997, and the extension of overseas citizenship, which is in many ways a second-tier citizenship, was a mistake, and I think it’s one that should be corrected. At a time when there are clearly tensions in Hong Kong, the UK could reassure many Hong Kong citizens that their existing rights are recognised by the UK, and they are valued.”

 

GO RED CHINA! GO RED CHINA! GO DAZIS! GO DAZIS!

 

 

 

 

Hong Kong Freedom Ralliers Successfully MSG the Mainland and the World

  • World transport hub:Hong Kong International Airport is one of the busiest in the world, handling 1,100 flights daily across about 200 destinations.

Hong Kong airport shut down after protesters storm inside

 

Hong Kong’s airport canceled all flights Monday after thousands of pro-democracy protesters stormed into the main terminal of one of the world’s busiest travel hubs to denounce police violence.

“Airport operations at Hong Kong International Airport have been seriously disrupted … all flights have been canceled,” the city’s airport authority said in a statement. “All passengers are advised to leave the terminal buildings as soon as possible.”

Hong Kong has been roiled by mass protests calling for democratic reforms and an independent investigation into police conduct, with both the demonstrators and police turning to more extreme tactics.

In Beijing, the cabinet’s Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office issued a statement saying the situation in the former British colony was “beginning to show the sprouts of terrorism” and constituted an “existential threat” to the population of Hong Kong.

“One must take resolute action toward this violent criminality, showing no leniency or mercy,” spokesman Yang Guang said in the statement.

“Hong Kong has reached an inflection point where all those who are concerned about Hong Kong’s future must say ‘no’ to lawbreakers and ‘no’ to those engaged in violence,” he added.

Earlier Monday, police showed off water cannons that could be deployed in the case of future demonstrations, a development that Amnesty International has warned could lead to serious injuries.

“Water cannons are not a toy for the Hong Kong police to deploy as a sign of strength,” Man-kei Tam, the group’s Hong Kong director, said in a statement.

“These are powerful weapons that are inherently indiscriminate and have the potential of causing serious injury and even death.”

The slogan “An eye for an eye” was plastered all over the airport — a reference to a female protester whose eye was injured during clashes with riot police who fired tear gas and beanbags on Sunday, according to CNN.

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It was a very big year.