'Anonymous' Inside the Military? Insider Tells All

Editor’s Note – Are Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden heroes, traitors, whistle blowers…? That is up to you, but reading this article may change your point of view. The other reason we bring this to you is also to show what our military and government are also doing, as reported by an “insider”, but again, you be the judge.

Do you believe this account? Anyway you look at it, questions just continue to flow and its most conceivable that ‘Anonymous’ types likely do work in all industries, government, and the military.

Anonymous’ Secret Presence In The U.S. Army

“There are people who I only know as screen names but I have put my career in their hands.” One member tells all.

By Justine Sharrock – BuzzFeed

An active-duty Army captain and member of Anonymous describes how the organization operates, his own involvement in the Arab Spring, how the crackdown on Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden has affected soldiers, and how more leaks are on the way. He has agreed to speak with BuzzFeed on the condition of anonymity.

A Guy Fawkes mask on the dashboard is just one way this Army captain tips off other soldiers that he’s a fellow member of Anonymous.
A Guy Fawkes mask on the dashboard is just one way this Army captain tips off other soldiers that he’s a fellow member of Anonymous.

Are there a lot of members of Anonymous in the Army?

There are more than you would think, more heavily in the techie world [of the military] — especially at Fort Huachuca, where all the intel people are. A lot of them wanted to get the job [there] because they want to learn secret stuff and have a better personal understanding of how the world actually works.

How do you know who is in Anonymous?

Initially we have the handshaking phase. The lingo is still relatively unknown. In conversation, you drop in jokes. If you are with someone on a mission, you’re like, “Man, there are over 9,000 reasons that this is a bad idea.” That initially establishes friendship. Once you feel comfortable with the person and they aren’t just posing as part of the culture, then you talk about what they’ve done and how much a part of it they are. It gets to the point where you are discussing individual operations.

What are the most popular operations amongst soldiers?

Anonymous is so distributed and leaderless that everyone has operations they love and hate. Operation Cartel, especially at Fort Bliss. Operation Dark Net was universally loved. And Operation Payback was pretty well received.

What about you?

I was involved in the Arab Spring opening up internet communications. I was a facilitator for a lot of people who have more skills than me in the cyber world. I knew people who I met through 4chan, 9Chan, and 7Chan and then a lot of AnonOps IRCs and who they needed to talk to — the organizations that would help them, and people in government would give them resources and access — and was able to convince them to talk to people in Anonymous. I got people in the right [internet relay chat] rooms at the right time.

Would the military consider you a white or black hat?

The military sees me as black hat.

Is that a fair assessment?

All hats are gray. Every white hacker I know has a night job that is very much a black-hat job.

What were the results of what you did for the Arab Spring?

From what I heard they were able to establish ways to assist the activists to have a method where they could get information out of Egypt and have certain Twitter accounts tweet that information on their behalf. But I don’t know for sure. As soon as I was like, “Hey, this is this person,” and vice versa, they did tweet confirmation to make sure that certain Twitter accounts were controlled by certain people, and then I headed out of the room so there would be no “taint” of having a fed there.

Why do Anonymous members outside the military trust you?

My credibility is incredibly suspect in the group. I admit I work for the feds, and I provide information on myself so that they are comfortable. There are people who I only know as screen names but I have put my career in their hands.

What specific actions have other soldiers taken?

There are several [soldiers] I know that probably did things, but I don’t know know that they did. I can legally say, probably under a [lie] detector, I have no proof that they did it. We keep our activities totally separate because at any point in time I can be put in the chair that I can’t lie in. You have to keep the /b/ [4chan’s “Random” board] brotherhood strong.

Does the military know about the Anonymous presence?

Pre-Manning, there were several academic papers put out trying to analyze it and school the leadership. Because the Army is a very top-down organization, they assume that [Anonymous] is too. Leadership wasn’t concerned with it until Manning happened. Then they read everything under the [lens] of what Manning did and it just scared them — scared them blind. They know we are in there and they assume that we are all going to do a Manning or a Snowden.

How have they addressed it?

Every six months you are mandated to get a Threat Awareness and Reporting Procedures Brief. It used to be very much like how to … spot the Iraqi contractor who is pacing off your base. Now it is, “Look at the person at your left and right. Are they espousing social beliefs that don’t line up with Army values? What websites do they go to at work?” With the caveat that it is OK to have political beliefs that are different. You get a heavy-handed feeling.

I have had more than a few officers come up to me and as we are trying to talk about [Anonymous] they are worried, like, “Are you CID [working undercover for the Central Investigative Division]?” Because you always worry about that.

Are the retaliations against Manning and Snowden discouraging Anonymous activity and the desire to leak information?

A lot [of Anonymous members] have been in long enough and are jaded. They are watching as the government comes down harder and harder. There is a growing sense of disdain and hatred because we are complicit in it. There are some secrets that need to be secrets but the stuff [the military] keeps secret just to protect the bottom line — you just feel like you are selling your soul every day. That is a lot of the motivation. Especially for people of the generation that believe that information should be free.

Are we going to see more leaks?

Yes. A lot [of Anonymous members] are mid- to high-rank NCOs. They are well-respected, have connections, and overly large security clearances. A lot of people who are part of the [Anonymous] culture are just dying at this point for something to come across their table that isn’t already out there. It is so easy to leak information that if you want to, you can do it.

‘Anonymous’ Threat – Take down the whole internet!

From WebProNews

Anonymous just keeps on making grander threats, but they have finally made the greatest threat possible – shutting down the entire Internet.

In a pastebin post that we won’t link to for obvious reasons, a member of Anonymous posted a document called “Operation Global Blackout.” You may remember #OpGlobalBlackout from a previous Anonymous video that promised the take down of major Web sites, but this threat is a lot bigger.

Anonymous claims that they are going to take down the 13 root DNS servers that power the entirety of the Internet on March 31. They even list the IP addresses for the 13 servers to let other members join in on the attack.

They say that by cutting off these DNS servers, they will essentially disable the HTTP Internet. Anybody looking up something as simple as http://www.google.com will be met with an error page. They want to remind citizens, however, that they are not trying to kill the Internet, they just want to hit where it hurts most.

They outline the new tool that will be used to accomplish this goal. It’s called the Reflective DNS Amplification Tool. It will attack the root servers with static IP addresses that will allow them to keep on attacking the servers while the Internet is down.

They end the post with these words:

We know you wont’ listen. We know you won’t change. We know it’s because
you don’t want to. We know it’s because you like it how it is. You bullied us into your delusion. We have seen you brutalize harmless old womans who were protesting for peace. We do not forget because we know you will only use that to start again. We know your true face. We know you will never stop. Neither are we. We know.

We are Anonymous.
We are Legion.
We do not Forgive.
We do not Forget.
You know who you are, Expect us.

It’s hard to really tell if this is a true threat due to the decentralized nature of Anonymous. It could just be a baseless threat. We’ve reached out to one of the few confirmed Anonymous sources for comment, but have yet to hear back. If we do, we will update this story.

‘Anonymous’ and other Hackers – DHS Warning

Editorial Note – SUA stays very current on reporting threats to our infrastructure that is based on complete internet management. We have published quite often about cyber threats and now the DHS is formally announcing the ‘Anons’ (The group called Anonymous) have actually threatened our power systems, water supply, and transportation systems. SUA is once again posting this as a caution and current alert by DHS. Living off the grid may be very real and you should prepare.

Hacker group threatens industrial computer systems

Washington Times

By Shaun Waterman

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is warning that hackers from the loose online protest collective called Anonymous have threatened attacks against the computer systems that run factories, power stations, chemical plants, and water and sewage facilities.

“While Anonymous recently expressed intent to target [industrial control software], they have not demonstrated a capability to inflict damage to these systems,” reads a leaked bulletin from from the department’s National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center.

DHS did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Industrial control software (ICS) systems, also known as Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems, are considered among the most dangerous targets for hackers because successful attacks could damage or destroy the industrial equipment they control — blowing up power generators, releasing clouds of dangerous chemicals or polluting water supplies.

The bulletin, which is unclassified but restricted “For Official Use Only,” notes that hackers from Anonymous have posted computer code and other material that show an interest in ICS computer programs, and some ability to get access to ICS systems.

It also warns that the group’s hackers “could be able to develop capabilities to gain access and trespass on [ICS] networks very quickly,” although they have not yet carried out any attacks.

The bulletin says oil and gas companies might be at particular risk because of what it calls a “green energy” agenda on the part of Anonymous, highlighting the campaign the group has supported against the trans-continental Keystone XL oil pipeline and the Alberta Tar Sands project in Canada.

“This targeting could likely extend beyond Anonymous to the broader [hacker activist] community, resulting in larger-scope actions against energy companies,” warns the bulletin, issued last month and posted Monday by the website Public Intelligence.

The bulletin notes that tools used by both “white hat” and “black hat” hackers to search for holes in computer security are increasingly able to look at ICS equipment.

Such tools “can be directly used with novice level skills in hacking and little to no background in control systems,” the bulletin states.

“In addition, there are control systems that are currently accessible directly from the internet and easy to locate through internet search engine tools and applications. These systems could be easily located and accessed with minimal skills in order to trespass, carry out nefarious activities, or conduct reconnaissance activities to be used in future operations,” the bulletin warns.

The bulletin urges “owners and operators of critical infrastructure control systems … to engage in addressing the security needs of their [ICS] assets.”