US Undermined Egyptian Counter-Terrorism War on MB

Editor’s Note – The author of the following article, Tera Dahl is the Executive Director of the Council on Global Security. She is also a partner with Stand Up America US and recently planned and implemented the recent trip MG Vallely and a delegation of other national security experts and journalists made to meet with senior officials in Cairo recently.

In addition to this piece, a new release came out today about the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt and what candidate al-Sisi believes should happen:

Egyptian presidential favourite and former army chief Abdul Fattah al-Sisi has vowed that the ousted Muslim Brotherhood group “will not exist” should he win. In his first interview with Egyptian TV, he added that two assassination plots against him had been uncovered.

Mr Sisi removed Egypt’s first democratically elected president Mohammed Morsi from power last July. He is widely expected to win the presidential election on 26-27 May. (Read more here at the BBC.)

It is about time we in America learned what the Egyptians already know about the Muslim Brotherhood.

Please read on:

Egypt’s Counter-Terrorism War Undermined by US Insistence on Muslim Brotherhood

By Tera Dahl – Breitbart

On a recent trip to Egypt with a delegation of national security experts and journalists, we had the opportunity to meet with senior-level Egyptian security officials, as well as several members of the country’s various religious and civil society movements. The message being disseminated in the Western press about Egypt is contrary to the reality on the ground.

A recent Los Angeles Times article repeats the accusation that Egypt’s response to terrorism is in fact the reason Egypt is in such trouble. This narrative has become entrenched in some circles of the US foreign policy establishment. To quote directly from the article, “…some U.S. officials warn that the Egyptian actions may alienate civilians and spur anti-American sentiment.”egypt_morsi_obama_protest_AP

The inference is that the al-Qaeda-affiliated political movement known as the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), ousted from government, continues to be the most important “civilian” political entity in the Arab world’s most populous nation and that the MB is a legitimate political actor.

This is despite the Brotherhood being removed as a result of what may have been the largest popular democratic revolt in history, with tens of millions of anti-Brotherhood protesters flooding the streets in the summer of 2013 in rejection of the Brotherhood’s theocratic regime.

Having spent an extensive amount of time in Egypt since the removal of President Morsi last June, I can say with confidence that “anti-American sentiment” is currently at a dangerously high level, but not for the reasons many in the press cite.  The animosity stems from America’s policies of not backing the Egyptian people and their war on terrorism.

On our recent trip, members of Egypt’s civil society, that very backbone which any future democratic polity must be built on, asked us why Washington is supporting terrorism and not supporting the Egyptian people and military in their fight against terrorism. Many everyday Egyptians simply don’t understand why the U.S. cannot perceive the political reality on the ground. Egyptians are facing a counterinsurgency war in their very backyard – on Friday, an Egyptian soldier was killed by a suicide bomber in the Sinai and a policeman was killed and four more wounded by an explosion in Cairo.

In the same Los Angeles Times article, an unnamed U.S. counter-terrorism official was quoted as saying, “We fear that the Egyptian government’s heavy-handed tactics may be fueling recruitment for ABM [Ansar Bayt al Maqdis] or other extremist groups in the region.” Would it have been better for the Egyptian people to have allowed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood to stay in power and embrace the fact that they were turning Egypt into a terrorist state?

POTUS-Cairo-Speech-2009-copyOne of President Morsi’s first official acts was to release the brother of Ayman Al Zawahiri, the head of al Qaeda, from prison and put him in charge of relations with the Sinai, the very area where foreign fighters have been waging a war against the people of Egypt. This same individual was later responsible for organizing the violent protest at the American Embassy in Cairo on September 11, 2012.

There is a clear campaign in the Western media and in many Western think-tanks and policy organizations to turn the Egyptian military into the enemy and the terrorist organization of the Muslim Brotherhood into the innocent, democracy-loving victims. This narrative is deceitful and needs to be countered. The Egyptian military is America’s ally and has been since 1973, and the Muslim Brotherhood is America’s enemy. The Egyptian military is fighting against terrorism; America fights against terrorism. America and Egypt are fighting the same enemy with the same ideology that killed thousands of Americans on 9/11, thousands of Americans in Iraq, and is still killing our troops in Afghanistan today.

An institutional double-standard is evident when comparing Ukraine and Egypt. Both nations faced popular political change that aligned with the U.S.’s national interest against common foes. Congress rallied to the side of the Western-leaning Ukrainian government but continues to balk at supporting Egypt. Why?

Mohammed Morsi and his allies were turning Egypt into a failed, terrorist state. This included turning the Sinai into a safe haven for HAMAS and other militants, or as we were told in Cairo, turning the Sinai into an “Islamist Ivy League.” Morsi gave Ahmadinejad and the Iranian Revolutionary Guard a red carpet welcome in Cairo and went out of his way to engage with Iran in diplomatic relations for the first time since 1979.

Morsi granted himself far-reaching powers, issuing constitutional amendments that he had no authority to assume, placing himself above any judicial oversight. Then he released hundreds of HAMAS prisoners and other terrorists, to include Zawahiri’s brother. egypt-morsi

Now, after the ouster demanded by the Egyptian people, Morsi is being prosecuted for the deaths of protesters outside of Ittihadiya palace in December 2012, where at least ten people died in clashes, as well as his escape from Wadi el-Natroun prison and his clandestine relationship while in power with HAMAS, Hezbollah, and Iran’s Revolutionary Guard.

What sense does it make to not support Egypt – and therefore push them towards Russia and risk losing our strongest ally in the Arab world and assist Russia in gaining a new strategic ally?

A message that was repeated quite often to us was that the United States’ policies (or absence thereof) are creating anarchy and instability in the region. To quote our hosts, Libya and Syria are turning into a new Afghanistan. “You left Libyans, you washed your hands of Libya,” they say. And we have.

There are reports of training camps in Libya run by the “Free Egyptian Army” seeking to wage war against the Egyptian security forces. The Egyptian military may have no other choice but to use military force in Libya to control their borders and protect their country. President Obama’s war in Libya has created an Al Qaeda safe haven which will have dire consequences for the region and also the United States.

The United States can no longer turn a blind eye to the chaos and anarchy in Libya. Militants are killing Libyan security forces and civilians every day in Libya, and instead of the Obama Administration taking any action to clean up the mess they created, they have instead embraced the Muslim Brotherhood, the terrorists, in Libya.”

Morsi worked to change the identity of Egypt into an intolerant, theocratic state, not unlike Iran. The Egyptian people knew that in order to save their country, they had to do something and could not wait three more years for elections that had already been dominated by a political movement with no respect for democracy. With no impeachment mechanism in the Brotherhood-written constitution, they had no way to politically remove Morsi. So they started a petition calling for early elections. The petition received 22 million signatures, whereas Morsi was only elected by 13.2 million people.

Following the petition, Egyptians held the biggest political protest in history on June 30th, when 33 million people went to the streets calling for early elections. Egyptians risked their lives to go out in the street to save the future of their country, much as Ukrainians are now doing in Eastern Ukraine. In Egypt the military intervened against a theocratic dictator and in favor of Egyptians who put Egypt first.

The United States has been consistently pressuring Egypt to be “all inclusive” with members of the Brotherhood. Why should any nation strive to be inclusive of a movement that believes in destroying all opposition and diversity? The Muslim Brotherhood’s ideology is treasonous to any country where it exists. The motto of the Muslim Brotherhood is “Allah is our objective. The Prophet is our leader. The Qur’an is our law. Jihad is our way. Dying in the way of Allah is our highest hope”.

We need to take them at their own word, as delivered by the Muslim Brotherhood’s Supreme Guide, Mohammad Badi:

Arab and Muslim regimes betray their people unless they confront not only Israel but also the US. Waging jihad against both is mandatory for all Muslims. Otherwise, “They are disregarding Allah’s commandment to wage jihad…”

All Muslims are required by their religion to fight as their highest priority, since “the improvement and change that the [Muslim] nation seeks can only be attained through jihad and sacrifice, and by raising a jihadi generation that pursues death just as its enemies pursue life.”

The only solution for the Muslim Brotherhood is a complete dismantling of the organization. Period. Instead America has adopted a policy of apology and appeasement, placating the terrorists, seeing them as the victims. This is all based on the altogether false narrative that the Brotherhood is a democratic and peaceful organization.

America has been on a trajectory of alienating our allies and emboldening our enemies while at the same time weakening our military. This is a very dangerous path, and our lack of attention to the reality in the Middle East is not going to serve us well in the future.

ALERT – Update from Egypt, Correcting Western Media Reports

Editor’s Note – Stand Up America and our partners at The Westminster Institute have been in constant contact with their new friends in the government of Egypt under General al Sisi since their official visit last September with him and other high level state, church, and military leaders.

Today, MG Vallely received an urgent update from his high level contacts in Cairo and wants to share with our readers the Egyptian State Information Service (S.I.S.)  press release to continue to bring you the real story. Please read on:

Press Release

SIS Assures Egyptian Judiciary’s Independence and Demands All to Respect its Sentences

MG Vallely Dr Patrick Sookhdeo General El Sisi
MG Vallely and Dr Patrick Sookhdeo meet with Egyptian leader General al Sisi last September in Cairo.

In light of the assigned role to the State Information Service (S.I.S.) in presenting the correct information about all events occurring in Egypt, and its subsequent review and observation of comments published in foreign media outlets about the “Abdeen” Misdemeanor Court’s sentence to imprison “April 6th Movement” founder Ahmad Maher and activists Ahmad Douma and Mohamed Adel for 3 years and fine them 50 thousand EGP each.

S.I.S. would like to indicate that Egypt, in this transitional period, is striving to establish a democratic state where the law prevails and all citizens are equal against its rule. Therefore, the three activists’ trial was held in light of executing the law and according to legal procedures that ensure their right to defend themselves.

In this regard, S.I.S. would like to note that the law organizing the right to hold public meetings, convoys, and peaceful protests confirms in its first article the right to hold and join public meetings, convoys, and peaceful protests according to the provisions and regulations outlined in the law, which do not detract from the guarantees to freedom of speech and intellect nor do they restrict them.

In fact, the law is to organize and secure protests and assure the safety of participants as well as that of citizens at large, which is an established practice in many democratic nations where prior notification is required.

With this said, S.I.S. would like to shed light upon a number of facts as follows:

  • The above mentioned gentlemen have been previously accused by the General Prosecutor of participating in the violent incidents that occurred at the “Abdeen” Court perimeter in Downtown Cairo on November 30th where they assaulted security forces assigned with protecting the court, as well as, organizing a protest without prior notification in front of the “Shurra” Council in addition to other accusations of congregating and disrupting public transportation; all of which are in violation of law “107” of the year 2013. It is worth noting here that the “Abdeen” Misdemeanor Court’s sentence is a preliminary one and the convicted reserve the right to appeal.
  • The arrest of Mr. Mohamed Adel occurred at the “Egyptian Centre for Economic and Social Rights” in execution of the General Prosecutor’s decree to detain him and bring him to justice.

Finally, S.I.S. would like to reiterate the Egyptian Government’s confirmation that there no longer is a room for violating the law under any pretext and that the law shall be enforced upon all without exceptions regardless of political or party affiliation. The Egyptian Government, further, reinforces that it respects and upholds rights to freedom of speech and expression, peaceful assembly, and freedom of press.

In addition, the Constitutional Declaration issued on July 8th, 2013 states in articles (7), (8), and (14) that crimes and punishments are only in accordance with the law and that punishments are only implemented by a court sentence. The Egyptian Government, further, confirms that in light of the checks-and-balances system, the prevalence of law is the foundation of ruling and that the Egyptian Judiciary system and its judges are independent.

Diana West: Jerusalem to Be the Capital of … What?

By Diana West

If Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood candidate for president Mohammed Mursi (right) wins, Egypt’s capital moves from Cairo to Jerusalem. So stated a leading Islamic leader, Safwat Hagazy, during a recent campaign rally as Mursi and MB head honcho Mohammed Badei looked on.

Outrageous? Fantastic? Not in Muslimworld. As crack Islamic law expert Stephen Coughlin pointed out to me today, the 2008 charter of the Organization of the Islamic conference similarly calls for OIC’s “permanent headquarters” to be moved to Jerusalem after the city’s “liberation.”

Mohammed Mursi - Muslim Brotherhood candidate for Egyptian Presidency

Article 21 of the OIC Charter:

The Headquarters of the General Secretariat shall be in the city of Jeddah until the liberation of the city of Al Quds so that it will become the permanent Headquarters of the Organisation.

Al Quds is the Islamic name for Jerusalem.

The OIC is the Organization of Islamic Cooperation  (it used to be known as the Organization of the Islamic  Conference). With 56 Islamic member states represented by heads of state and foreign ministers, it is the largest voting bloc on the international stage, a unified front to advance Islam and its laws across the world.

If your logic reflexes are telling you that, gosh, that sure sounds like a new caliphate is taking shape with a proposed capital in Jersualem, you’re right. Such observations fail to earn space in the MSM but you’re still right. The MSM are worse than uninformative, which just might have something to do with shrinking profits.

From Qudsmedia:

“Our capital shall not be Cairo, Mecca or Medina. It shall be Jerusalem with God’s will. Our chants shall be: ‘millions of martyrs will march towards Jerusalem’,” prominent cleric Safwat Hagazy said, according to the video aired by Egypt’s religious Annas TV on Tuesday. The video went viral after being posted on YouTube – accompanied by English subtitles by Memri TV –, with 61,691 views until Thursday night.

“The United States of the Arabs will be restored on the hands of that man [Mursi] and his supporters. The capital of the [Muslim] Caliphate will be Jerusalem with God’s will,” Hegazy said, as the crowds cheered, waving the Egyptian flags along with the flags of the Islamist Hamas group, which rules the Gaza Strip.

“Tomorrow Mursi will liberate Gaza,” the crowds chanted.

“Yes, we will either pray in Jerusalem or we will be martyred there,” Hegazy said.

Hegazy’s speech came during a presidential campaign rally at the Egyptian Delta city of Mahalla, where Mursi attended along with the Muslim Brotherhood Supreme Guide Mohammed Badei and members of the group and its political wing the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP).

Israel Today Magazine also carried Hagazy’s recent comments:

A prominent Egyptian cleric with ties to the Brotherhood added to those fears last week when he told a large rally that should Mursi win the election, Egypt’s capital will no longer be Cairo, but rather Jerusalem.

“The United States of the Arabs will be restored on the hands of that man [Mursi] and his supporters. The capital of the [Muslim] Caliphate will be Jerusalem with Allah’s will,” said Safwat Hagazy in a speech broadcast on Egypt’s Annas TV. “Yes, we will either pray in Jerusalem or we will be martyred there.”

Mursi and other Muslim Brotherhood officials were in attendance at the rally.

Last month, Muslim Brotherhood General Guide Mohammed Badie issued a written statement calling Israel’s rebirth the “worst catastrophe ever to befall the peoples of the world” and demanding that the “Zionist entity” withdraw from all the “land of Palestine.”

Like Hamas and the regime in Iran, elected Muslim Brotherhood officials (even the president) ultimately answer to or are significantly influenced by religious leaders within their movement. While Mursi may become the president of Egypt, Badie will remain in control of the Brotherhood.

Hamas, which is an off-shoot of the Muslim Brotherhood, is eager for a Mursi victory in Saturday’s election.

A Muslim Brotherhood victory “will make Israel weaker and more isolated. Israel will have no friends or alliances left in this region,” Hamas spokesman Ghazi Hamad told the Los Angeles Times last week.

Even before the feared Brotherhood takeover, there are already signs Egypt is returning to a position of outright hostility toward Israel.

Earlier this month, Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram reported that Egypt’s government censor had halted production on a private film that allegedly promoted normalization of relations with Israel. The movie’s writer insisted that the film – which follows the lives of an Egyptian, a Palestinian and an Israeli – was not intended to promote Israel, but rather to encourage peace and cooperation, something in which Egypt’s new rulers apparently have no interest.

At the same time, Egypt’s censors approved a wildly popular new song titled “I Love Israel,” which in fact urges the exact opposite sentiment toward the Jewish state.

“May it [Israel] be destroyed. May it be colonized. May it be wiped off the map. May a wall fall on it. May it disappear from the universe. God, please have it banished,” go the lyrics of the new hit by singer Amr El Masry.

Did the Washington Post report on Hagazy’s declaration?

Nope.

How about the New York Times?

Nope.

But former Postie-chief Leonard Downie, Jr. did manage to  pen a thumbsucker bemoaning the cost-cutting demise of Watergate-inspired “investigative reporting.”

Not that it costs anything to read the OIC Charter ….

Islamists want to hide the ‘idolatry’ of the Pyramids

Editor’s Note – As SUA has been reporting since the beginning of the end of the Mubarak Regime in Tahrir Square, we cautioned: “be careful what you ask for, you might just get it”. In the case of Egypt, even the most naive are seeing that the big run to democracy in Egypt has unearthed the vileness, the very evil, Mubarak has been holding down for over 30 years.

Yes, he was a dictator, a strong man, a cruel ruler, but he was such, over an even more evil under current. One that only those who truly understand these emerging enemies have warned you about. Now, even the ‘strange bedfellows’ of support are seeing the underbelly of the Middle East and the Magreb. What is strangest about the following article, is the picture of the ‘Robbers Tunnel’. Why, because it was the Muslim Caliph al-Ma’mun who hired the robbers around AD 820. Funny thing…History!

We say it again…It is ISLAM…get used to it, you, or more likely your kids, will be fighting them…again, just as Jefferson understood in the infancy of our own democracy. However, our democracy was well designed and created, in a republic form, just to make sure the tyranny of the majority, and the knee-jerk reactionaries could not ruin it for the rest of us. To make sure a religion could not take over, even this one, truly an ideology cloaked in a religious form.

Pandora’s Box, its been kicked over, and its evil is oozing out…

The Salafist party’s plan for the Pyramids? Cover them in wax

By MICHAEL BURLEIGH

Mail Online

The pyramids at Giza are the most stunning sight I have ever seen. True, their lonely eminence is threatened by Cairo’s unlicensed building sprawl, with half completed houses inching their way towards them. Surveying them at night as the calls to prayer multiplied into a thunder of sound from central Cairo already told me a few years back what was coming.

For now members of the Nour (The Light) Salafist party, which won 20 per cent of the vote in recent elections, are talking about putting an end to the ‘idolatry’ represented by the pyramids.

This means destruction – along the lines essayed by the Afghan Taliban who blew up the Banyam Buddhas – or ‘concealment’ by covering them with wax. Tourists would presumably see great blobs rather than the perfectly carved steps.

Wonder: The Pyramids at Giza are under threat from destruction or 'concealment' by covering them with wax

This last suggestion was made by Abdel Moneim Al-Shahat, a Nour candidate for parliament. Apart from wanting to do away with this ‘rotten culture’, this gentleman also wants to ban the Nobel prize winning novels of Naguib Mahfouz, one of many great Egyptian writers.

I suppose they could call in the great Bulgarian artist Christo, who specialises in putting curtains across the Grand Canyon or surrounding Pacific atolls in fetching pink cloth? But I doubt they have heard of him.

Salafism means reverting to the mores of the founding generation of Islam, for the close companions of the Prophet were called Salafi meaning ‘pious founders’. Since the last adherent of ancient Egyptian religion allegedly converted (to Christianity) in the fourth century AD, the original Salafists had little to worry about the pyramids and left them alone.

But not their 21st century successors, who also want what they call ‘halal’ tourism, with women told to dress decorously and no alcohol, something pretty general already in conservative Egypt. The Salafists want segregated beaches, which will not go down well with visitors to Sharm el Sheikh.

Tourism accounts for 11 per cent of Egypt’s $218billion GDP. Right now, hotels and resorts report falls in occupancy from 90 to 15 per cent.

Grand: Today tourists can go into the Great Pyramid via the Robbers' Tunnel dug by workmen employed by Caliph al-Ma'mun around AD 820.

This is bad news for the 3million Egyptians who depend on the 14million tourists who visit Egypt each year.

The people affected are not simply waiters and chambermaids, but taxi drivers, camel and horse ride touts, shop and stall owners and ordinary villagers who make a bit on the side providing tea and snacks for Nile cruises.

One of the great tragedies of what is afoot in the Middle East is the extinction of the last vestiges of a vibrant, cosmopolitan culture, as represented by another great Egyptian novelist, the Cairo dentist, Alaa Al Aswany, author of the remarkable Yacoubian Building.

It is becoming hard to recall that in the 1950s – under King Farouk – Egypt had a thriving film industry, producing 300 movies a year, and that its national chanteuse, Umm Kulthum, was worshipped throughout the Middle East.

But now the fanatics are in the saddle, so its good bye to all that. We’ll have to wait for fundamentalism to fail, as Nasserite ‘national socialism’ did before it. For Nour and the like surely have no answers to the problems of contemporary Egypt.

 

Muslim Brotherhood on fast track to take over Egypt

Editor’s Note – The Muslim Brotherhood is fast tracking the move to take over Egypt. The date of the elections is not confirmed and the Coptic Christians remain threatened and panicked due to corruption in all sectors. Broken foreign policy began with our very own State Department and is now leading to a radical Islamic State in Egypt, which was held at bay for years by the fall from grace of Hosni Mubarak.

Deal to Hasten Transition in Egypt Is Jeered at Protests

NY Times

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK

CAIRO — Egypt careened through another day of crisis with no end in sight as hundreds of thousands of people occupying Tahrir Square jeered at a deal struck on Tuesday by the Muslim Brotherhood and the military that would speed up the transition to civilian rule on a timetable favoring the Islamist movement.

The agreement, which centered on a presidential election by late June, appeared unlikely to extinguish the resurgent protest movement — the largest since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak nine months ago. The crowd roared its disapproval when the deal was announced at 8 p.m., fighting spiked on the avenue leading to the Interior Ministry, and the number of protesters continued to swell.

Unlikely to satisfy the public demands for the military to leave power, the deal may have driven a new wedge into the opposition, reopening a divide between the seething public and the political elite, between liberals and Islamists and, as events unfolded, among the Islamists themselves.

“We refuse it, and the square has refused it already,” said Islam Lotfy, a former leader of the youth wing of the Muslim Brotherhood who was expelled from the organization with a group of others for starting a centrist political party. “They did not offer anything new. They are just bargaining with the people.”

Just four days ago, the Muslim Brotherhood kicked off a wave of protests against the military’s increasingly explicit attempts to decree for itself special powers and protections under the future constitution. But when a heavyhanded crackdown on demonstrators ignited a far broader and more violent backlash against the military’s power grab, Brotherhood leaders sent mixed signals about whether to join the swelling protests. And while other political groups called for a huge demonstration on Tuesday, the Brotherhood ordered its members to stay away for fear of jeopardizing elections as the violence hit a peak.

The Health Ministry said 31 people died in four days of unrest, and more than 600 were injured on Tuesday alone.

For the military and the Brotherhood, the deal was the closest embrace yet in the off-again-on-again partnership since the revolution between the country’s two most powerful institutions — reprising roles played out under Mr. Mubarak, who outlawed, but tolerated, the Muslim Brotherhood during his three decades in power.

For Egyptian liberals, the open deal between the two most powerful and organized forces in the nation raised fears of being caught between groups at odds with their goals: a military reluctant to submit to democratic oversight, and an Islamist movement with a potentially narrow view of individual freedoms.

“Pessimists fear the Saudi scenario,” Shady el-Ghazaly Harb, a liberal activist, said recently, referring to the possibility of imposing both strict Islamic moral codes and a harshly undemocratic government.

The agreement was worked out in a meeting held by Gen. Sami Enan, a top leader of the military council, who invited all of the major political parties and their leaders. Most liberal parties and leaders, including the presidential contender Mohamed ElBaradei, declined to attend, as did the moderate former Brotherhood leader Abdel Moneim Aboul Fotouh, another presidential contender. All said that negotiating with the generals would confer legitimacy on their authority and that the solution to the crisis should come from the protesters in the street.

Of the roughly 10 parties and leaders that met with General Enan, the Brotherhood was easily the most influential. For the Brotherhood, the accord promises to achieve a critical goal, by beginning the first parliamentary elections in the post-Mubarak era on Monday, as scheduled; the Brotherhood’s newly formed Freedom and Justice Party is poised to reap big gains from its advantages in outreach and organizing. And with those gains in the new parliament, the Brotherhood would be able to help shape the writing of a constitution.

For the military, the deal would allow it to retain unfettered authority at least until late June. Many liberals and Islamists had grown concerned in recent months about the military’s increasingly overt effort to preserve a decisive role for itself in politics far into the future.