A Tribute to Admiral Ace Lyons: A 21st Century Swamp Fox

A Tribute to Admiral Ace Lyons: A 21st Century Swamp Fox


By Joseph Schmitz

February 16, 2019

“We the People” need now more than ever a few more “Swamp Foxes” like the late great Admiral James Aloysius “Ace” Lyons: a 21st Century Francis Marion.

Francis Marion served during the American Revolutionary War. According to The Society of the Cincinnati, “the nation’s oldest patriotic organization, founded in 1783 by officers of the Continental Army,” past presidents general of which include George Washington and Alexander Hamilton, Marion fought “during the defense of Charleston in 1776 and rose to the rank of colonel in the Second South Carolina Regiment. After the fall of Charleston in 1780, Marion was appointed brigadier general of State Troops and launched an effective campaign of harassment against British detachments around the state. His cunning and success in eluding capture in the coastal lowlands earned him the grudging admiration of his opponents and an enduring place in South Carolina lore as the ‘Swamp Fox’.”

As a modern-day Swamp Fox, Admiral Ace Lyons continued to serve after his retirement from naval service in 1987 by taking on the same swamp that President Donald Trump was elected in 2016 to drain — the administrative state run amuck.

Another retired flag officer, U.S. Military Academy graduate and retired Air Force Lieutenant General Thomas McInerney, described Ace Lyons at the latter’s January 11, 2019, Naval Academy funeral reception as “the Navy’s version of George Patton.”

Products of competing service academies, George Patton of West Point and Ace Lyons of Annapolis, neither George Patton nor Ace Lyons cowered in the face of political correctness. Both exuded extraordinary leadership, courage, and patriotism.

The biography in Admiral Lyons’ funeral program describes him as having “retired as a four-star admiral and commander in chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet on October 1, 1987.  . . . A graduate of both the Naval War College and the National War College, he was a principal advisor on significant Joint Chiefs of Staff matters and is considered the ‘father’ of the Navy Red Cell, an anti-terrorism group comprised of Navy SEALs.

“After 36 years of naval service, Admiral Lyons embarked on an equally impressive career as President/CEO of LION Associates, LLC, a premier global consulting company. His many positions included Chairman of the Center for Security Policy’s Military Committee and the senior member of the Citizens Commission on Benghazi.”

In and out of uniform, Ace Lyons personified Article One of the 1775 Naval Regulations, in which the Continental Congress mandated that, “The Commanders of all ships and vessels belonging to the thirteen united colonies, are strictly required to shew in themselves a good example of honor and virtue . . . and to discountenance and suppress all dissolute, immoral and disorderly practices.”

Speaking of “dissolute, immoral and disorderly practices,” Admiral Lyons after retirement took on the various strains of “social engineering” being promoted by politicians and academicians at the time to the grave detriment of military readiness. One web-posted video tribute to Admiral Lyons begins by Admiral Lyons asking his audience:

“Where is our military leadership on all these social engineering issues? They’re violating their oath of office. There’s no question about it. However, they’ve been silenced by the political correctness gestapo watchdogs, and it really distresses me to see that, because I believe no President could withstand the entire Joint Chiefs of Staff standing up and saying, ‘We’re not doing that and if you go ahead here’s our papers. It wouldn’t happen.”

The ongoing abuses of power by inhabitants of the current “swamp” in Washington, D.C. wouldn’t happen any more if more American patriots would follow the lead of the late great Admiral Ace Lyons, an extraordinarily courageous modern-day Swamp Fox.

May God rest the soul of Admiral James Aloysius “Ace” Lyons, a role model for any patriotic American willing to take on the administrative state run amuck, in or out of uniform.

Joseph E. Schmitz served as a foreign policy and national security advisor to Donald Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign. The opinions expressed in this article are his personal opinions. Schmitz served as Inspector General of the Department of Defense from 2002-2005 and is now Chief Legal Officer of Pacem Solutions International. He graduated with distinction from the U.S. Naval Academy, earned his J.D. degree from Stanford Law School, and is author of “The Inspector General Handbook: Fraud, Waste, Abuse, and Other Constitutional ‘Enemies, Foreign and Domestic.”





Breaking News! More Collusion Found!

 


How come the lights went on before he clapped?”

What is the DOJ and the FBI hiding?

911 emergency call system could soon be routed through RUSSIAN satellites, giving Putin’s government the power to snoop and interfere with first responders

  • Russia’s own GPS system covers more ground than US satellites, so wireless phone companies want to leverage it to help locate 911 callers
  • Rep. Mike Rogers, an Alabama Republican, is furious and says the move could give signals intelligence to an antagonistic Russian Federation
  • ‘GLONASS’ is a Russian satellite network that has been able to see the whole planet since 1995
  • Part of its software crashed for a half-day last April, generating navigation signals that were off by as much as 50 kilometersBy

David Martosko, U.S. Political Editor for The Daily Mail

January 22, 2015

U.S. astronauts are already blasting off to the International Space Station on Russian rockets. But now the Federal Communications Commission is weighing a plan to use Moscow-based satellites to route America’s 911 emergency phone calls.

Congressional Republicans, already skittish about trusting the Vladimir Putin regime as it airs its expansionist desires through Europe, fear the Russian leader would gain access to real-time information about emergency responders in every corner of the United States.

That data, piped through Russia’s GLONASS precision navigation and timing satellite system, already allows police, fire and rescue crews to pinpoint cellphone callers’ locations. 

National security alarms are going off, and they’re as loud as fire bells.

Alabama Republican Rep. Mike Rogers, who chairs am Armed Services subcommittee on strategic forces, wrote to warn Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper.

‘In view of the threat posed to the world by Russia’s Vladimir Putin, it cannot be seriously considered that the U.S. would rely on a system in that dictator’s control for its wireless 911 location capability,’ Rogers wrote, in a letter first reporter by The Washington Times

‘Our response to Russia’s hybrid warfare, arms control cheating, illegal invasions of sovereign nations, and energy-based extortion must be broad-based isolation and counter-leverage.’

A trade group that worked on the plan with major wireless phone carriers – including AT&T Mobility, Sprint, T-Mobile USA and Verizon – disagrees.

Trey Fogarty, government affairs director at the National Emergency Number Association, said there’s no American satellite system that can cover enough ground on its own without help from GLONASS.

His group worked with the companies and the Association of Public Safety Communications Officials (APSCO) to develop a way to give police, firefighters and medics better tools to locate people in time to help them when seconds count.

‘Our view is that we ought to be leveraging anything that is available to find someone in an emergency,’ Fogarty told the Times. 

APSCO says Rep. Rogers is overreacting based on ‘plainly false statements that stretch the imagination to try to make a case that the roadmap’s inclusion of GLONASS for location determination presents a security threat.’

That stark condemnation came from the association’s government relations chief, Jeffrey Cohen, in a Dec. 24 letter to the FCC.

 

GLONASS itself is an alternative GPS system operated by 24 satellites, with 4 more planned. In April 2014 the entire system went offline for a half-day, leading everyone from Russian military planes to commercial shippers to generate incorrect location data – which was in some cases off by more than 50 kilometers.

Russia Today, a state-funded news outlet, reports that Moscow began developing GLONASS in 1976 and reached the point where it could cover the entire planet’s surface in 1995.

A total of 19 ground stations collect satellite data for consumer applications, providing signals with accuracy up to one meter.

‘Three more stations are located in the Antarctic and one in Brazil,’ according to RT, ‘with two more to be constructed in Kazakhstan and one in Belarus.’

Yesterday SU-25 fighter jets carried test modules over the skies of northern Kyrgyzstan on practice runs to demonstrate its military applications.

It’s the largest and only comprehensive GPS-workalike system in existence, according to Russian media outlets, which also report that its underlying technology has been shared with North Korea and Belarus. 

Sprint said it aims to minimize the degree to which American companies rely on the Russian satellites.

‘The roadmap does not envision that carriers will rely exclusively on the GLONASS system,’ the company’s government affairs director Ray Rothermel wrote on Dec. 24 to FCC officials.

‘Rather, the roadmap advocates taking advantage of a tool that is available now to allow carriers to improve location information.’ 

The FCC has the authority to green-light or spike the proposal, but hasn’t chosen a path forward yet. A January 29 meeting, however, could bring the issue to a head.

Retired Rear Admiral David Simpson, chief of the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, said his agency is ‘committed to protecting both public safety and national security as we continue to examine the input and issues in the proceeding, and will coordinate with our colleagues across the government to ensure that national security needs are addressed.’ 

The Pentagon has found itself blind-sided in the past by concerns about handing Russia the keys to U.S.-based signals intelligence.

In 2013 the State Department said it was considering giving Roscomos – the Russian space agency – clearance to erect six buildings in the U.S. outfitted with with antennas and signal processing electronics.

Members of Congress were outraged and wrote special language into the 2014 National Defense Authorization Act forbidding such deals with foreign nations.

Article

‘911, what’s your emergency?’ Russian satellites may run U.S. safety system

Risks of sabotage, espionage too high for some lawmakersA

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FCC weighs plan to use Russian satellite network for 911 system, raising security concerns

Article

Merry Christmas and Season’s Greetings December 25, 2018

 

Merry Christmas and Season’s Greetings!

From  Stand Up America, the SUA Staff, Supporters and

MG and Mrs. Vallely

The “America First Team”

 

Be sure to take some time out of your busy lives to enjoy the magic of the holidays this season. There is nothing more magical than the Birth of Jesus Christ, family, friends, decorated trees and lights to brighten us up.  Give and receive love this holiday season and you will surely have a joyous Christmas. Best wishes to your family and always may Christmas spread cheer in your lives!

 

There is no greater gift this holiday season than spending time praising God with family all around the Christmas tree. Wishing all of our family members peace and love this holiday season. May you feel the joy in your home that you bring to us at SUA. We are wishing you blessings and joy this Christmas. We are so happy to call you a member of our family and we cherish your support.

 

You gifted us with your friendship and support for many years now. This Christmas, we thank you for being our rock of strength in good times and in bad. You deserve all the goodness and goodwill that the Christmas season brings. Christmas is the time to give gifts to your family and let them know how much you care about them, so that’s what we are doing. The best present one can hope for this year is to spend time together as a united America.

 

May God’s blessing shine down on you and your family. Sending love from our family to yours. This is a joyous season to take a step back from our busy lives and enjoy time with our loved ones. Best wishes to you and yours.

 

MG Paul E Vallely – Chairman Stand Up America.

 

A Tribute To Admiral James “Ace” Lyons

 

To Fellow Flag Officers

 

It is with deep regret I inform you of the passing of Admiral James

Aloysius “Ace” Lyons, Jr., U.S. Navy (Retired) on 12 Dec 2018 at age 91.

Admiral Lyons graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in June 1952 and served

as a Surface Warfare Officer until his retirement as four-star

Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet on 1 October 1987.  In multiple

leadership assignments in Navy strategy roles in the Pentagon and in command

of Second Fleet and Pacific Fleet, ADM Lyons played critical part in in the

development and implementation of the President Reagan Administration’s

Maritime Strategy.  In multiple innovative exercises, such as Ocean Venture

81, ADM Lyons demonstrated to the Soviets that the U.S. Navy could truly

surprise and hurt them in the event of war, forcing the Soviets to have to

contemplate a much larger defense budget at a time when their economy and

internal situation were deteriorating.  A case can be made that  ADM Lyon’s

effective execution of the Maritime Strategy was the “straw that broke the

camel’s back,” contributing to the collapse of the Soviet Union several

years later; others might argue that the effect was even more direct and

decisive and was in keeping with Sun Tzu’s dictum that the highest form of

military art is to win without fighting (but a key to  that is to be ready

to win, which ADM Lyon’s epitomized.)

 

After a stint in the Merchant Marine, ADM Lyons enlisted in the U.S. Naval

Reserve on 30 Jun 1947, entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1948 and

graduating with the Class of 1952, playing football and with a BS in Naval

Science.  His career got off to a bit of a slow start with three months

aboard  attack cargo ship USS LIBRA (AKA-12,) conducting training on the

U.S. east coast assigned to Amphibious Force, Atlantic Fleet.  This was

followed by two years as a patient at Portsmouth and Bethesda Naval

Hospitals, followed by a year at the Bureau of Naval Personnel.  He resumed

sea duty in November 1955 aboard the heavy cruiser USS SALEM (CA-139)

deployed for 20-months as a “permanent” flagship for Commander, SIXTH Fleet

and homeported in Ville Franche-sur-Mer, France.  During this period, SALEM

(last heavy cruiser in the  world completed and the only one still in

existence,) responded to the 1956 Arab-Israeli War/Suez Crisis and two

crises in Jordan.  In January 1958, he reported to the destroyer USS MILLER

(DD-535,) which supported the landings of U.S. Marines in Lebanon during a

Mediterranean deployment, after which she served as a training ship for over

11,000 Naval Reservists (gaining some notoriety when a cadet from a New

Zealand cadet training ship swam across Boston harbor at night and raised a

Russian flag on the MILLER as a joke.  Many were not amused.)  In July 1961

he reported to Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla FOUR as ASW and Gunnery

Officer/Staff Duty Officer operating along the Atlantic coast and engaged in

significant ASW experimentation.

 

In July 1963, ADM Lyons attended the U.S. Naval War College, followed by a

little over two years in the Office of the CNO as Surface Warfare Plans

Officer, Strategic Plans Division, Naval Warfare Plans section, where he was

promoted to commander in 1966.  In November 1966, he assumed command of the

destroyer USS CHARLES S. SPERRY (DD 697,) which deployed to the

Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific during this

period.  In August 1968, he reported to the staff of Commander SIXTH Fleet

as Executive Assistant to the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations and

Plans/Head, Anti-submarine Warfare and Ocean Surveillance Division,

following the move of 6th Fleet from France to Gaeta, Italy.  Commencing in

June 1970, he studied for a year at the National War College, followed by

another two years in the Office of the CNO as Executive Assistant and Senior

Aide to the Deputy CNO for Plans and Policy, during which he was promoted to

captain.

 

In January 1974, ADM Lyons assumed command of the destroyer leader (later

re-designated cruiser) USS RICHMOND K. TURNER (DLG-20) for a homeport shift

from Newport to Norfolk, followed by a Mediterranean deployment.  In June

1975 he reported as Chief of Staff to Commander, Carrier Group FOUR, which

was engaged in a significant transformation to the modern Battle Group

concept (i.e, where the Flag is responsible for the whole battle group not

just the carrier and air wing.) Some credit him with turning the Carrier

Group from an administrative construct to a true warfighting organization.

In March 1978, he was back in the Office of the CNO yet again for four

months as Deputy Director, Strategic Plans and Policy Division, followed in

June 1978 by a tour in the Office of the Joint Chiefs of Staff as Assistant

Deputy Director, Political Military Affairs where he was designated as a

rear admiral while serving in a billet commensurate with that rank (and

actually promoted rear admiral on 1 June 1979.)

 

In July 1980, he assumed command of Naval Surface Group Western Pacific

This was followed in July 1981 when he was designated a vice admiral and

assumed command of SECOND Fleet (and NATO Striking Force Atlantic) and

almost immediately participated in major NATO exercise Ocean Venture, a two

month exercise involving over 250 ships and 120,000 crewmen from 14

countries, spanning the South Atlantic to the North Cape of Norway, followed

by two more major exercises, characterized by extensive use of emissions

control, dispersed formations, deception, bold use of electronic warfare,

all calculated to get in the Soviet’s face, frequently by surprise.    In

July 1983, he returned  to the Office of the CNO as Deputy CNO, Plans,

Policy and Operations (OP-06,) which prior to the Goldwater-Nichols Act had

a much more operational role than today, which in addition to operations

affecting the Soviet Union also included significant anti-terrorist

activity, including the Achille Lauro hijacking incident.  He was then

designated an admiral (four-star) in September 1985 as Commander-in-Chief,

U.S. Pacific Fleet.  He immediately implemented a bold exercise regime

similar to that in the North Atlantic, using THIRD Fleet as a primary

warfighting force in the far northern Pacific in proximity to the Soviet

Union.  Yet, his tenure was also marked by a successful visit of U.S. Navy

warships to the People’s Republic, the first in 37 years.  Nevertheless, his

tenure was also contentious, as the “bugs” in Goldwater-Nichols between

Joint Theater Combatant Commanders and Fleet Commanders were still being

worked out the hard way.  Relations were rocky with the new U.S. Central

Command (in which ADM Lyons advocated much stronger action against Iran

during the “Tanker War,) and to a somewhat lesser extent, U.S. Pacific

Command, who was sometime caught as much by surprise by Lyon’s actions as

the Russians.  ADM Lyon’s deserved reputation for outspokenness was not

always well-received, and he came under pressure from Washington to retire

sooner than intended.  Former Secretary of the Navy John Lehmann would later

characterize this action as “the revenge of the nerds,” believing that the

services of a true warfighter had been lost prematurely.  ADM Lyons retired

in October 1987.

 

Admiral Lyons’ awards included two Distinguished Service Medals, the

Defense Superior Service Medal, two Meritorious Service, two Navy

Commendation and a Navy Achievement Medal.  Other medals and ribbons

included the Navy Expeditionary Medal (Cuba), Humanitarian Service and Armed

Forces Expeditionary Medal (Lebanon).  Foreign awards included the French

Legion D’Honnneur and the Republic of Korea Order of National Security

Merit.

 

Although ADM Lyons had a reputation as a driven task-master with

Patton-esque qualities, he was also mentor to a long list of officers (such

as Hank Mauz, Phil Dur and Hank Mustin, according to SECNAV Lehmann) who

went on to flag rank or major command tours.  ADM Lyons could definitely be

controversial, but his impact on the Navy, and on the outcome of the Cold

War, was profound, for which our Navy and nation should be grateful.

 

After retirement, ADM Lyons served as president and chief executive

officer of LION Associates, LLC., a global consulting enterprise.  He also

served on the board of directors for several companies, as well as on the

Advisory Board to the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, and as

consultant to Lawrence Livermore Laboratory.  He also authored numerous

articles and columns for the Naval War College Review and Naval Institute

Proceedings, and other national and international journals and newspapers.

In his later years, he showed he remained unafraid to make controversial

statements on controversial subjects, and whether one agreed with any of

them or not, they were motivated by a sincere desire to assure the safety of

this nation.  (One cause he advocated, with which I agree, was to restore

Husband Kimmel’s four star rank.)  Regardless, his absence from the scene

will be noticed.

 

Services and burial at the Naval Academy Cemetery.

 

Rest in Peace Admiral Lyons,

 

Very respectfully,

 

Sam

 

On a personal note, I had one close encounter with then-VADM Lyons, in 1985

when he was OP-06 and I was an Undersea Warfare Watch Officer in CNO

Intelligence Plot.  One weekend the Soviets took an action with potential

lethal consequences for a U.S. Navy asset, necessitating that I call a long

list of senior Navy officials.  VADM Lyons got there first, still in shorts,

a tank top (that was too small) and flip-flops, indicating he hadn’t dallied

a moment in responding to my call.  Although he had a reputation amongst us

JO’s as being on the bombastic side, what I saw that day was a cool, calm,

utterly professional flag officer, who instantly grasped the situation and

potentially grave  implications of what the Soviets had done, and

immediately took decisive measures to unsure appropriate actions were taking

place in the Fleet and Numbered Fleet.  He was an inspirational example of

leadership in crisis that I never forgot.  In the end, it may have turned

out to be a really bad day for a beluga whale, but fortunately not for the

U.S. Navy.

 

Samuel J. Cox

RADM, USN (retired)

Director of Naval History

Curator for the Navy

Director, Naval History and Heritage Command

A must watch to the end: